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Kenosha officer wounded in shootout released from hospitalSubmitted: 08/14/2020
Kenosha officer wounded in shootout released from hospital
KENOSHA - A Kenosha police officer wounded in a shootout last week while investigating a vehicle break-in has been released from a hospital, Wisconsin Department of Justice officials said Friday.

A release by the department's Division of Criminal Investigation identified the officer as Justin Pruett, who has been with the Kenosha police force for two years. He suffered a gunshot wound to the abdomen, the Kenosha News reported.

The suspect, Jonathan Massey, was arrested Tuesday in Gary, Indiana. Massey, 29, waived extradition during a court hearing Friday morning and is expected to be returned to Kenosha within 14 days to face charges.

Police said earlier they expect to charge Massey with attempted first-degree intentional homicide, being a felon in possession of a firearm and bail jumping.

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 IN OTHER NEWS

MADISON - The state is making more money available to help small businesses in Kenosha recover from damage during recent unrest over the police shooting of Jacob Blake, officials announced Wednesday.

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MADISON - The Republican-controlled Wisconsin Legislature on Wednesday appealed a federal court ruling that allows for absentee ballots to be counted up to six days after the Nov. 3 presidential election in the battleground state.

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MADISON - The University of Wisconsin-Madison lifted quarantine orders for two of its largest dorms on Wednesday, on a day when the state added 56 hospitalizations from COVID-19 complications to its record total.

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MEDFORD - Medford Area School District is voting this November on a 39.9 million dollar referendum for Medford Area High School. If approved the district plans to build additional classrooms to help promote a more creative, collaborative and hands on learning environment. Superintendent Pat Sullivan says, the small classrooms at the school have been a struggle for years for the District.
"We don't have enough classroom space. The classroom space we have was built in '68 so they were built small. Very little daylight. Some of them don't have any windows," Sullivan said. "We're using every nook and cranny. Every office space we can.
The referendum will also provide an additional gym and theater space.The proposed referenda would cost the public 53 dollar tax impact on a 100,000 household property. The district has already lowered their original proposal to match the public's feedback after the District released a survey.
Ultimately, the lack of space is not just an academic struggle for students, but one regarding their safety.
"If you had a situation where a student was positive, there's no doubt going to be a number of close contacts. We've been very honest about that and up front. We cannot social distance in many of our classrooms," Sullivan said.
As many districts move away from in-person classes, Sullivan says that this is the time to act in order to secure a better tomorrow for the community.
"Yeah, COVID-19 I get. It, [there's] a lot of uncertainty. But again, your always going to have something," Sullivan said. "It's never going to be a perfect situation."
The district will be having open house Q & A sessions about the proposal later next month. In the mean time, families can reach out to the district to schedule a tour to see the school for themselves. 

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MADISON - A federal judge said Wednesday that he won't rule before the election on a lawsuit that challenged a state law requiring college student IDs to have an expiration date in order for them to be used as a voter's ID.

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Farm adapts to COVIDSubmitted: 09/24/2020

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MERRILL - Grampa's Farm in Merrill like a lot of businesses have had to adapt because of COVID.

"We've expanded our hours and we've expanded our play areas to include more things and outdoor space," said Jered Severt, operator at Grampa's Farm.

But change is something that Severt and his family are used to.

"The dairy industry just wasn't working out for the smaller farmer," Severt said.

Severt and his family have had their barn for over 100 years.

"When I was born I came back to this farm," Severt said. "When my father was born he came back to this farm. My grandfather and his father and the previous father have all worked the soil here and have been a part of Grampa's Farm."

And without all the help from his family and friends, he knows none of this would be possible.

"It still continues to be family run but friends and neighbors," Severt said. "A lot of people working together to make this happen for a lot of other people." 

For more information on Grampa's Farm check out their website.

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MADISON - Gov. Tony Evers announced Thursday $8.3 million to support COVID-19 testing efforts at Wisconsin's private, nonprofit and tribal colleges and universities.

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