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After 5 months of waiting, Northwood Pets holds Grand Opening Submitted: 07/12/2020
Griffin Stroin
Sports Reporter
gstroin@wjfw.com

After 5 months of waiting, Northwood Pets holds Grand Opening
RHINELANDER - After five long months, Northwood Pets in Rhinelander was finally able to celebrate it's grand opening.

The pet store officially opened in March, but due to COVID-19, owner Jennifer Marshall had to push back her grand-opening.

"Today is our belated grand opening," said Marshall. "Basically we opened back in March which was three weeks before COVID had hit and we wanted to have our grand opening more in May-ish but because of everything going on in the community and the country we delayed things."

Northwood Pets has a wide variety of animals from parakeets to dozens of different fish.

"We wanted to be able to provide a wide variety for people," said Marshall.

And with that variety comes a lot of animals that might not seem like pets to the average customer.

"We also are a very unique pet store," said Marshall. "We wanted to introduce people to some really neat animals that make great pets. And also to be offered this to people in this area so they don't have to travel to get it."  

For more information about the store, check out their website:




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