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Spring college athletes find hope, difficulties in extra year of eligibilitySubmitted: 04/05/2020
Spring college athletes find hope, difficulties in extra year of eligibility
Andrew Goldstein
Andrew Goldstein
Sports Anchor/Reporter
agoldstein@wjfw.com

NORTHWOODS - College athletes facing cancelled spring seasons due to COVID-19 will get an extra year of eligibility.

Dealing with that disruption this season is still proving to be a challenge for many.

Lakeland Union graduate Kav FitzPatrick is part of UW Madison's cross country and track and field teams.

He and his teammates were preparing for indoor championships to cap off the winter season before the cancellations hit.

FitzPatrick is trying to stay in shape by running at home, but he says it's not the same.

"It was definitely disappointing, definitely a big blow," FitzPatrick said. "Had to take some time to really process that because it's the first time I can remember that I haven't been competing in track in the spring."

The NCAA will also raise roster limits to accommodate this year's seniors who want to return for another season.

It's unknown exactly how many spots will be added per sport or per team.

UW-Stevens Point baseball is already coming up with plans to use those extra open spaces.

"We may pick up some JV games and whatnot throughout the year," head coach Jeremy Jirschele said. "Hopefully we get a spring trip next year. But yeah, there will definitely be some new bridges to cross."

Decisions on whether college sports can return in the fall have not been made yet.

High school spring sports are still just postponed, not entirely cancelled.


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