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Absentee ballot requests soar in Oneida Co. amid coronavirus pandemicSubmitted: 03/27/2020
Dan Hagen
Dan Hagen
Reporter/Anchor
dhagen@wjfw.com

Absentee ballot requests soar in Oneida Co. amid coronavirus pandemic
ONEIDA CO. - Friday, Gov. Tony Evers called on the State Legislature to send an absentee ballot to every Wisconsin voter ahead of the April 7 Presidential Primary. However, Republican state leaders say the plan is simply not feasible.

About 1,400 absentee ballots were requested in Oneida County during the 2016 presidential primary. This year, that number has jumped to 4,000, as more people are looking to avoid voting in person.

Next Thursday, April 2, is the last day to request an absentee ballot from your municipal clerk. Oneida County Clerk Tracy Hartman encourages people to request it earlier than that. Under current laws, the ballot must return to the polling location by election day, on April 7.

"If you wait till April 2nd to request it," said Oneida County Clerk Tracy Hartman. "And if something happens with the mail and its delayed a day, your ballot may not get there. So we're encouraging everybody to get their requests in as quick as possible."

You can request an absentee ballot by going to MyVote.wi.gov. For now, there will still be in-person voting, despite the Safer at Home order.





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RHINELANDER - The protests related to the death of George Floyd started in Minneapolis and  they've now happened in over 100 cities across the country  and Monday night, Rhinelander hosted a peaceful protest of its own.

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"I'm extremely happy that it went peacefully there was some citizens that it was maybe not going be peaceful i am so glad that it was," said Williams-Alloway.


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"Because peace led us to one of the most peaceful men in America being murdered - Martin Luther King," said Norfleet.

Norfleet is the president of People for the Power of Love, a Wausau-based organization looking to combat racial injustice.

He's asking people to come to the 400 Block in Wausau this Saturday and have nine minutes of silence for the black community's latest victim of police brutality - but not to stop there.

"You coming in here and just standing will never get us change; neither did peace," said Norfleet.

The riots and protests across the United States have drawn comparisons to the late 1960s, particularly after Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered.

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