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'Angel in Antigo' anonymously donates $1,500 in gold coins to Salvation Army red kettle campaignSubmitted: 12/20/2019
Story By Stephen Goin

'Angel in Antigo' anonymously donates $1,500 in gold coins to Salvation Army red kettle campaign
ANTIGO - The sound of bells ringing at storefronts across the country marked the start of The Salvation Army's red kettle campaign. While some drop a dollar or a few coins into those buckets, an anonymous source in Langlade Co. made a surprising donation of solid gold.

Langlade Co. kettle coordinator Cavan Kelly said the generosity of his community never ceases to amaze him.

"Last year was our fourth year in a row of breaking $100,000," said Kelly. "A little over $112,00 raised last year."

Friday, Kelly was dressed in a fireplace onesie as he collected donations outside Fleet Farm in Antigo.

"If they see me always in some silly costume, that's going to bring a smile to their face," said Kelly.

Kelly said those smiles lead to bigger donations for the Salvation Army of Langlade Co. However, Kelly said a surprise donation early this week was unlike anything he'd ever seen.

"You understand right away where gold fever can come from," said Kelly.

In the red kettle stationed outside Fleet Farm, Kelly found 10 solid gold coins that weighed just 1 ounce all together. When Kelly had the gold coins appraised they were valued at close to $152 apiece.

Kelly said the over $1,500 donation was made entirely anonymously as most red kettle donations are.

"Don't know who it is, but I've referred to this person before as an 'Angel in Antigo'," said Kelly.

Kelly said he hopes the large donation will inspire people to continue giving, no matter the amount.

"This donation will end up going a long way to help some folks get their needs met this coming year," said Kelly."

Bell ringers across the country will keep on collecting donations until the day before Christmas. To volunteer, you can contact your local branch of the The Salvation Army.

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