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Teen charged with recklessly endangering safety after allegedly pointing a gun in schoolSubmitted: 12/10/2019
Teen charged with recklessly endangering safety after allegedly pointing a gun in school
Story By Newswatch 12 Team and Associated Press

WAUKESHA - Charges have been filed against a student who pointed a gun at officers inside a Wisconsin high school after he allegedly pointed it at another student's head.

18-year-old Tyrone Smith says he was "tired of being picked on."


Authorities say Smith brought a pellet gun to Waukesha South High School on December 2nd and pointed it at officers.

Police say Smith was shot three times after he ignored officers' commands to hand over his weapon.

At Monday's court appearance Smith was charged with second degree recklessly endangering safety in addition to three other charges related to the incident. Bond was set at 15 thousand dollars.

Smith is due back in court on the 17th for a preliminary hearing.

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RHINELANDER - The roundabout at the intersection of Highway 8 W and Highway 47 was pretty controversial a year ago; a lot of people didn't like it.

Oneida County Highway Commissioner Bruce Stefonek says the change caused controversy in the city.

"We had numerous meetings with the public and it was somewhat divided," said Stefonek.

Except now Stefonek says people have come around to accept the city's first and only roundabout.

"A number of people that were against it before now like it," said Stefonek.

Although the stoplight and 8 & 47 was familiar to people, it was also dangerous.

"There were a lot of accidents, it almost felt like they were weekly," said Stefonek.

He saw cars speeding through the intersection in order to beat other traffic.

"It was almost like a racetrack coming through the intersection," said Stefonek.

The roundabout was installed in August of 2019. Since then, there have been very few accidents.

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WASHINGTON - Spotify and the makers of Fortnite and Tinder are taking on Apple and Google as part of a newly formed coalition calling for "fair treatment" in the way the tech giants run their app stores.

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Farm adapts to COVIDSubmitted: 09/24/2020

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MERRILL - Grampa's Farm in Merrill like a lot of businesses have had to adapt because of COVID.

"We've expanded our hours and we've expanded our play areas to include more things and outdoor space," said Jered Severt, operator at Grampa's Farm.

But change is something that Severt and his family are used to.

"The dairy industry just wasn't working out for the smaller farmer," Severt said.

Severt and his family have had their barn for over 100 years.

"When I was born I came back to this farm," Severt said. "When my father was born he came back to this farm. My grandfather and his father and the previous father have all worked the soil here and have been a part of Grampa's Farm."

And without all the help from his family and friends, he knows none of this would be possible.

"It still continues to be family run but friends and neighbors," Severt said. "A lot of people working together to make this happen for a lot of other people." 

For more information on Grampa's Farm check out their website.

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- The way lawyers for Kyle Rittenhouse tell it, he wasn't just a scared teenager acting in self-defense when he shot to death two Kenosha, Wisconsin, protesters. He was a courageous defender of liberty, a patriot exercising his right to bear arms amid rioting in the streets.

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MADISON - The state is making more money available to help small businesses in Kenosha recover from damage during recent unrest over the police shooting of Jacob Blake, officials announced Wednesday.

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WASHINGTON - Many American workers applying for unemployment benefits after being thrown out of a job by the coronavirus face a new complication: States' efforts to prevent fraud have delayed or disrupted their payments.

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MADISON - On September 22nd the United States hit a staggering 200,000 COVID-19 deaths. Wisconsin alone has 100,000 cases. The high numbers of deaths and cases can be lowered by modifying our behaviors and by wearing a mask properly.

There have been revisions to the mask mandate. Originally, it was said that only people not feeling well are required to wear it. It was changed when it was discovered that just talking could cause an outbreak.

Dr. Jeff Pothof of UW Madison Health spoke about how not wearing a mask can affect your long term health.

"People who had no idea they were sick had enough virus where they could spread it and the only thing they needed to do to spread it was talk to someone else," said Pothof.

COVID-19 is all across the country and not wearing a mask is putting yourself and the people around you at risk.

"There is no way you can know. It is everywhere right now. To think that you live in a location where COVID-19 hasn't reached yet is just not true," said Pothof.

To ensure you're protected, wear a cloth mask that is two layers thick to prevent your droplets from escaping and to protect from other droplets.

Make sure to wash your cloth masks once a week and change paper masks once every three to 5 days.

"They need to cover your nose and your mouth. If you only cover your mouth, the mask is not effective. Those droplets are coming out your nose and it just doesn't work," said Pothof.

For those thinking there's no repercussions from catching COVID-19, there are health risks that can be long term and affect your everyday life.

"People who have had COVID-19 may not ever return to normal lung function and that can impact them in ways such as in physical exertion and their ability to do things. Their physical stamina may decreased because their lungs are no longer as effective as they were before they had COVID-19," said Pothof.

The other long term health risks of COVID-19 is an inflamed heart.

"Likewise people that have an inflamed heart muscle tissue their hearts don't pump as effectively. The more severe COVID-19 the more inflammation they saw in the heart muscle. And we don't know how long that will last. The more severe the COVID-19 the more inflammation they saw in the heart muscle," said Pothof.

In cities like Madison and Milwaukee, their hospitals are equipped to handle a large influx of people and have special wards to combat COVID-19--unlike the smaller hospitals in our communities.

"Even if you have a small outbreak , you're going to quickly strip the healthcare resources in your community and when that happens only bad things happen to those people," said Pothof.

Make sure to mask up properly, to keep your loved ones and your community safe. For more information, you can visit the CDC website.

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