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Rhinelander woman uses Trig's shopping spree to help family membersSubmitted: 11/18/2019
Story By Ben Bokun

Rhinelander woman uses Trig's shopping spree to help family members
RHINELANDER - Kathy Orton rushed to stuff her shopping cart with things like diapers and paper towels at 6 a.m. Monday. Most of it wasn't for her.

"No. It's for other people," said Orton.

Orton won the annual shopping spree contest at Trig's in Rhinelander. She had about three minutes to take two of almost any item in the store.

"I wasn't expecting this at all, so I thought 'get for everybody,'" said Orton.

To pay it forward, she made a list of things to get other people, starting with her mother.


"She [her mother] does a lot of baking and that at church, so I got her plastic gloves to wear when she does that," said Orton. "So just little things like that make it worthwhile."

Grabbing as many things as possible in two minutes and 48 seconds may seem like an easy task. But Orton said staying focused in a time crunch is difficult.

"Everything that I wanted was going through my head and to stop that and concentrate on 'ok, what aisle am I in and what am I getting in this aisle?' was the toughest part," said Orton.

Orton didn't get everything on her list, but nobody ever does, according to Trig's store manager Don Theisen.

"Even though we're announcing the time, it always goes faster than everybody thinks," said Theisen. "There's never enough time when it comes to a shopping spree to get everything you need."

Orton still hauled in $564 in items. She even managed to get a few things for herself.

"I got two huge cart-fulls of food and personal items that I need, so I'm really happy," said Orton.

Trig's has given away a shopping spree for the past 15 years.

Last year's winner took home over $1,000 in groceries.

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