Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

School-to-Work program gives temporary jobs to students with barriersSubmitted: 09/30/2019
Maya Reese
Maya Reese
Reporter
mreese@wjfw.com

School-to-Work program gives temporary jobs to students with barriers
ANTIGO - Goodwill locations across the Northwoods just received a grant to help them pay local high school students with learning or physical disabilities to temporarily work in their stores.

Antigo store manager Erica Kostichka says the money will go back into the community. 

"The funds we generate at the store go back into our community so this goes back into, you know, the high school students. They're able to come here, they're able to get a paycheck every 2 weeks. Its just an experience that not all communities have that opportunity," said Kostichka.

The donation will support the School-to-Work Program which provides training and work experience for high school students who may have barriers when trying to find a job.

Kostichka believes this program gives students a head start in joining the workforce.

"We really are wanting to, you know, remove barriers from and give those that, you know, might not have an opportunity somewhere else that opportunity to have that first job experience," said Kostichka.

She has seen the impact this program has on students throughout the school year.

"Just confidence as the year goes on. They're always a little nervous when they first come in but, you know, as things keep progressing they build that confidence and I think a lot of them need that," said Kostichka.

Michelle Arden, a teacher at the Antigo High School, participates in the program by training students on workforce etiquette.

They help foster skills that hopefully help students transition into new jobs.

"They get elements with interview skills, they get to �" we're in the classroom 2 days a week and we're on the floor 2 days a week working so we get all of the different elements that Goodwill is offering the students so now they'll take the job skills they learned in this program and venture into other jobs in the community," said Arden.

This is the tenth year of the program.

Teachers hope it continues to expand and provide hardworking employees.

"This will hopefully have a huge impact on our community because students then in turn will stay right here in antigo and they'll have qualified workers right within our own community," said Arden.


Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

GREEN BAY - The catering company for Lambeau Field and Miller Park says it has temporarily laid off about 1,300 employees.

+ Read More

WEST POINT - Governor Evers announced Thursday the official application and selection process for The People's Maps Commission, the nonpartisan redistricting commission to draw fair, impartial maps following the 2020 U.S. Census.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Wisconsin Capitol building will not reopen next week, as had been planned, and state employees will have to wear masks whenever they're working indoors to help slow the spread of the coronavirus, Gov. Tony Evers' administration announced Wednesday.

+ Read More

MINOCQUA - Among all other fish you can catch, walleyes are especially popular in the Northwoods.

30 years ago, the Minocqua chain of lakes had a sustainable population of walleyes; people could fish freely.

But when the population started to fall in the mid-1990's, artificial management became the only option to help restore the numbers.

Oneida County Fisheries Management Biologist Zach Woiak remembers the time when the walleye's population was all due to their natural way of life.

"Historically the Minocqua chain has had a very good walleye fishery that was all based on natural reproduction, so there was no stocking needed," said Woiak.

A local group of stakeholders, including representatives from the DNR, Walleyes for Tomorrow, and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission came together back in the early 2000's.

The group developed a plan while gathering public input

Woiak says the majority of anglers sided with the stakeholders.

"They were on board with it. We had a lot of public meetings and got a lot of public input. We made sure that all the stakeholders were on board. It's been pretty good," he said.

+ Read More

RACINE - A Wisconsin police officer says he did what any dog lover would do when a pet is in a burning home. He rescued the pup.

+ Read More

MADISON - Wisconsin health officials confirmed about 750 more cases of COVID-19 in the state Thursday.

+ Read More

NORTHWOODS - Ascension Wisconsin Spirit Medical Transport announced adjustments to its air medical transport operations in northern Wisconsin. 

According to Ascension, Spirit 2 helicopter at the Howard Young Medical Center in Woodruff, will discontinue its service at the end of this year.

Spirit 3, a fixed wing aircraft stationed in Arbor Vitae, will stop operating at the end of August.

Dr. Stewart Watson of Ascension says that a review showed that their air medical transport needs would be best met with a single helicopter, strategically placed at the Central Wisconsin Airport in Mosinee.



+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: