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Wolf numbers steady in WisconsinSubmitted: 06/11/2019
Wolf numbers steady in Wisconsin
Story By Newswatch 12 News Team

MADISON -
The number of wolves in Wisconsin seems to be fairly stable, but still above the DNR's goals.

Survey results released by the DNR show around 950 wolves roamed the state last winter.


That's up slightly from the year before.

Wolf surveys are conducted annually during the winter, when snow provides good tracking conditions.

About 100 volunteer trackers help the DNR survey the population.

Wolves are on the endangered species list right now, but the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed removing that protection.

That would return wolf management authority to the state.

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In addition, restrooms and garbage receptacles will be available and fees will be charged at sites that are open and have full services.

Please note that some developed dispersed campsites in the Lakewood-Laona Ranger District remain closed due the July 2019 blowdown.

The Forest has two sites operated through a concessionaire permit that will also be opening.

The Two Lakes Campground will be open on a first-come, first-serve basis starting today and resume reservations on Sunday, June 7.

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