Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Wisconsin senate bill proposes ban on race, sex and disability-based abortionsSubmitted: 04/23/2019
Stephen Goin
Stephen Goin
Reporter/Anchor
sgoin@wjfw.com

Wisconsin senate bill proposes ban on race, sex and disability-based abortions
NORTH CENTRAL WISCONSIN - Wisconsin lawmakers will soon discuss legislation that could place new limitations on abortion.

Senate Bill 173 would ban "selective" abortions, or those based solely on the race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex or "congenital disability" of an unborn child, like Down syndrome.

"We need to stand up for these individuals, because if we're not as lawmakers, who is," questioned Stevens Point Republican Sen. Patrick Testin, a co-author of the bill.

He admits selective abortions aren't a pressing concern for Wisconsin.

"Even though it might not be a huge issue in the state at current ... we want to make sure these vulnerable populations are protected," said Testin.

A study from medical journal Prenatal Diagnosis, reports over a 16 year period ending in 2011, 67% of American women chose to end their pregnancies after a down syndrome diagnosis. According to the Guttmacher Institute, there's little evidence to prove race or sex based terminations occur.

Another provision of Senate Bill 173 would require doctors to inform women that selective procedures are illegal. However, it's not the women seeking those procedures who would face repercussions for breaking the law.

It would punish abortion providers if their patients or partners file a civil claim. If the patient is a minor or dies during the procedure, their parents would be able to sue for emotional of physiological distress. 

Faith-based, life affirming organizations have their own concerns with the bill.

"I would like to see the legislation get worked through," said Jack Hoogendyk of Hope Life Center in Wausau.

He says the legislation has the potential to take away a woman's privacy and power to choose.

"I would rather see that the woman makes the decision on her own," said Hoogendyk.

That's a decision Sen. Testin hopes the government can influence in an effort to end discrimination.

Senate Bill 173 was introduced Monday and referred to the Committee on Health and Human Services. The bill is not seeking to change Wisconsin's current law which allows for abortion over 20 weeks if the mother's life is in danger.

Bills banning abortion based on a Down syndrome diagnosis have passed in Utah and North Dakota.


Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Zion Lutheran Church didn't hold a live nativity scene for roughly 30 years. Last year, the event returned. In its second year back, the number of people involved has grown.

"We have a message of timely importance that is important for all people," said Zion Lutheran Staff Minister John Kanter. "We want to share with our friends and neighbors in Rhinelander."

The nativity will be the same as last year with live participants, live animals and even a choir. There is a slight change to the event, but it's an addition.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - The Oneida County Health Department released the results of the Wisconsin Wins compliance checks.

The program sends minors accompanied by county health officials to purchase tobacco products.

Wisconsin law requires all retailers to check for I.D. if the customer appears to be under 40 years of age.

The Health Department and the Northwoods Tobacco-Free Coalition worked together to conduct the random checks.

This year's results showed 95% of retailers were in line with the law.

+ Read More

GREEN BAY - Fans eager to see the Packers-Bears rivalry should be cautious when buying their tickets. The team received several reports of fake tickets sold online.

The Packers, Green Bay Police Department, and the Wisconsin Department Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection all warn to only purchase verified tickets from official sources.

+ Read More

WASHINGTON - Senator Ron Johnson joined New Hampshire Democrat Maggie Hassan in introducing a new law regarding cybersecurity Thursday.

The Wisconsin Republican chairs the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - As temperatures dipped to 20 degrees below zero across North Central Wisconsin Tuesday night, some people woke up their cars barely starting. Others discovered that their battery died. O'Reilly Auto Parts in Rhinelander encourages people to make sure their batteries are ready to go for winter.

Batteries wear down overtime and usually have a life expectancy of four years. Anything beyond that time can create some uncertainty. If people try to jump their cars on a frozen battery, that can cause other problems too.

+ Read More

Play Video

MARATHON COUNTY - After the city of Rhinelander shut down two municipal wells due to pollutants called PFAS, local and state officials have looked for solutions.

+ Read More

Play Video

LAC DU FLAMBEAU - The Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program was first introduced in four states 17 years ago, but Wisconsin adopted the program in 2008.

Only two school districts in the Northwoods have this program in place. 

The Lac Du Flambeau Public school was one of the schools in the Northwoods to receive a grant for the "Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program."

Super Intendent Larry Ouimette said this type of program helps students eat healthy.

"If they are getting the nutrients that they need, then they can perform better in and outside of school," said Ouimette.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: