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Race car driver hones skill in the NorthwoodsSubmitted: 02/16/2019
Dan Hagen
Dan Hagen
Reporter/Anchor
dhagen@wjfw.com

Race car driver hones skill in the Northwoods
EAGLE RIVER, WISCONSIN - People from around the United States visited Eagle River to drive as fast as they could through icy courses during the second annual Subaru Winter Experience. Most of them were here for fun, but one driver meant business.

Keanna Erickson-Chang doesn't have the bravado you'd expect in a race car driver.

"Typically I'm pretty calm, in the car and out," said Erickson-Chang.

She had no interest in racing cars growing up, she just took winter driving classes to be safer on the roads.

"But once I learned all the techniques in sliding the car," said Erickson-Chang. "I started having more fun and it snowballed from there."

Erickson-Chang has raced for four years. Saturday she took a pause to hone her skills on Dollar Lake at the second annual Subaru Winter Experience in Eagle River. She normally competes on gravel, but she used the ice instead for a chance to practice at slower speeds.

"We have to be early, because with the low grip it takes so long for everything to happen so patience is a key value out here," said Erickson-Chang.
Event organizer Patrek Sandel gave her one-on-one lessons. They focused on setting up corners. This means sliding sideways into the turn so the driver can accelerate sooner towards the next turn. Accelerating too late means losing valuable seconds, and perhaps even prize money.

"Its so cool to go with people like Keanna that really have a passion for the sport the same way I do and see her progress," said Sandel. "Only during this day she's stepped it up so much and right now I couldn't do it better."

Erickson-Chang was just in Eagle River for the day, but she said she hopes her training on the ice will lead to top finishes across the country. The last day of the 2019 Subaru Winter Experience is March 1st. If you miss it, join them next year for the third annual. 


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