Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Board chair: Lynne mining 'off the table' after convincing referendum vote TuesdaySubmitted: 11/07/2018
Story By Ben Meyer

Board chair: Lynne mining 'off the table' after convincing referendum vote Tuesday
ONEIDA COUNTY - The Oneida County Board Chair used the term "off the table" to describe metallic mining in the town of Lynne going forward.

Nearly two-thirds of the county said "no" to mining exploration in an advisory referendum question on Tuesday.

The county board doesn't have to follow the wishes of voters in the referendum. But Chair Dave Hintz now calls the chances of the board moving forward on mining "remote."

"The answer was not yes. The answer was no," Hintz said Wednesday. "So, we will not go through that due diligence process, which means mining of the Lynne property is off the table, not on our agenda at this point."


The Lynne ore deposit contains valuable minerals below county-owned land in western Oneida County. Mining companies have showed interest for years. But it's also near the Willow Flowage, a major water resource in the county.

This year, the county board put the referendum question asking about mining on the November ballot.

"We would like to put this thing to bed for quite a while," said Jeff Brown, a Lynne resident and member of the Protect the Willow anti-mining group.

Brown calls the group a team of political "rookies." But nearly 12,000 Oneida County voters agreed with the group's message on Tuesday. Sixty-two percent of the county voted "no."

"The people across the board, Republicans and Democrats, have said, 'It doesn't matter what party we're at, we don't want a mine in Oneida County on the county forest land,'" Brown said.

Hintz admitted the board could act against the wishes of the voters, but said it wasn't likely.

"I think it's a remote possibility. I do not give that a strong chance of success," he said.

"We don't have a social license to lease our public lands in the town of Lynne for mining. I hope that our county board will listen to what their constituency has made clear," said Pete Zambon, who handled communications and coordinated canvasses for Protect the Willow.

The Lac du Flambeau Tribe also fought hard for a "no" vote, on the ground and through television commercials.

"I think the people have spoken loud and clear," said tribal president Joseph Wildcat Sr. "A lot of the tribal community is happy, and also, I think, the residents of an area like the Willow. We're all trying to protect the resources."

Hintz said he was most impressed by the Oneida County turnout. More than 19,000 people voted on the mining question.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

NEW YORK - The day after Donald Trump's election in November 2016, the American Civil Liberties Union posted a message to him on its website: "See you in court."

+ Read More

MADISON - An oversight board is considering firing Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales after he ordered officers to use tear gas to break up protests over George Floyd's death, the last straw for members upset with how the chief has handled incidents since the arrest of Milwaukee Bucks player Sterling Brown in 2018.

+ Read More

DETROIT - Joe Biden's Democratic presidential campaign has launched a new national ad focused on Black Americans, urging them to stand up to President Donald Trump the way their ancestors stood up to "violent racists of a generation ago."

+ Read More

THREE LAKES - On Thursday, August 20th starting at 10:00 AM the Demmer Library will be giving away 100 trees.

+ Read More

- Wisconsin Safety Council announced on Thursday that its 78th Annual Conference would be held virtually on Sept. 1 & 2. The conference - planned to be hosted in Wisconsin Dells - was moved to a virtual event following feedback from members and out of an abundance of caution surrounding COVID-19.

+ Read More

Play Video

THREE LAKES -

Students and parents have been patiently waiting to hear from local school districts on what classes will look like in the fall.

Last night, the Three Lakes School District flipped the script, they instead took questions from community members to hear their concerns.

Educating is a stressful job, now imagine trying to plan a school year around a global pandemic, and combine that with answering questions from nearly 130 parents in one night. That's a day in Teri Maney's shoes.

"It was truly a listening session...this was laying the groundwork so people have an idea of what we're planning and thinking about at the district," Maney said. 

 Those plans primarily aim to have students back in the classroom full time.

 "That would be our goal to return on site five days a week," she added. 

But with COVID-19 showing no signs of letting up in the U.S. backup plans will be in place for any changes.

"Our next level would be a blended approach," Maney added, "We're keeping our primary focus on elementary students being on site and that might mean for our junior high and high school, a little shift of scheduling."

Three Lakes would then approach any positive cases in the district through guidelines from Oneida and Vilas county health officials.

"We also have a plan for if we would have a positive identification in a grade level, or a teacher, or if there's a teacher. We would not want to shut down the entire district," Maney explained. 

But if things don't go as planned, Three Lakes will be fully prepared for online classes.

"The last level, level four, that would be fully remote instruction."

The school board will vote on Monday night at 6:30 whether or not they will continue with the district's plan. 


+ Read More

- Facebook's Instagram is officially launching its answer to the hit short video app TikTok - Instagram Reels.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: