Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Brewers fans get team logo cut into their hairSubmitted: 10/14/2018
Andrew Goldstein
Andrew Goldstein
Sports Anchor/Reporter
agoldstein@wjfw.com

Brewers fans get team logo cut into their hair
MILWAUKEE - The Milwaukee Brewers logo has been on hats, t-shirts and all kinds of other clothing. It just doesn't usually go in people's hair.

Tony the Barber never let convention dictate his style.

"I've been a barber for 15 years and I started doing the signs, like, 10 years ago," Tony said.

With the Milwaukee Brewers surging in the playoffs, people like Matthew Reyes have been coming in to get the logo in their hair. Matthew is getting Milwaukee's old-school logo cut, which is a surprise from his father, Luis.


"We were supporting the Brewers," Luis said. "We live in Milwaukee, in the Greenfield area, so we've been Brewers fans for a really long time."

The cut takes roughly 90 minutes. It's enough time for Tony the Barber to skillfully shave, trim and color the baseball glove.

But Lids and Clips does a lot more than just Brewers logos.

"They've also done Packers logos as well," owner Lazaro Alvarez said. "We've also done superhero logos here. Whatever the customer wants."

"I just need the picture, you show me what you really want, and I can do that," Tony said.

Every member of the Reyes family wants the Brewers haircut, even the person who wasn't there.

"The wife is completely on board," Luis said.

Meanwhile, Matthew can only imagine what the kids are going to say at school on Monday.

"That's cool. I wish I could have one," Matthew said.

This isn't just a World Series promotion. Visitors to the Milwaukee area at any time of year can get a Lids and Clips logo in their hair.


Related Weblinks:
Lids and Clips Facebook Page

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

MADISON - Wisconsin environmental regulators will consider high-capacity wells' impact on surrounding water bodies when issuing permits, aligning with Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul's stance on the issue.

+ Read More

OSHKOSH - The Oshkosh Public Museum was preparing and planning for the enduring story of the ill-fated White Star liner RMS Titanic to dock once again at the Oshkosh Public Museum on August 12, 2020. 

+ Read More

RACINE - Five people, including three juveniles, were shot at a beach in Racine as an argument escalated to gunfire.

+ Read More

MERRILL - Swimming lessons started back up in Merrill this week.

Reintroducing kids to the pool came with a lot of new safety measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Merrill's administration is limiting the number of swimmers only to individuals or programs that booked reservations ahead of time.

Kids will also no longer share lanes, either with each other or with an instructor.

Instead, parents are being asked to lend a hand to cut down on the risk of transmission.

+ Read More

LUDINGTON, MICH. - A man who handled finances at a Lake Michigan ferry company pleaded guilty Tuesday to fraud in a scheme to steal money from the business.

+ Read More

- Though Black Out Tuesday was originally organized by the music community, the social media world also went dark in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, joining voices around the world outraged by the killings of black people in the U.S.

+ Read More

Play Video

NORTHERN WI - With low enrollment numbers and rising expenses during the COVID-19 pandemic, some child care facilities will have to permanently close.

Even prior to the pandemic, Wisconsin faced issues with how many centers were available to take in kids. And with COVID 19 lingering, facilities have taken a hit in enrollment.

For Little Sunshines Learning Center in Three Lakes, owner Rachael Kirby says her facility went from full capacity to 20 percent enrollment when the pandemic hit.

"During the safer at home order we had very low attendance," Kirby said. "We were just taking in children from essential workers, it hasn't been easy by any means.

And since the lifting of the safer at home order, Kirby says enrollment is still not back to normal.

"It's hard for business, some businesses are being offered from employers to have hours at home which means they keep their children home," Kirby said. "We're still probably at 40-45 percent enrollment at this time."

She's not alone.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: