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High school students put price tags on trees to show how much they are worth to the community Submitted: 10/04/2018
Story By Nina Schlosberg

High school students put price tags on trees to show how much they are worth to the community
PHILLIPS - We say money doesn't grow on trees. Some Phillips High School students want to convince their community that trees themselves are worth a lot of money. For the last few years, Bob Dural has been giving his students a mission.

"Three years ago we had kids doing an inventory where they went around town and updated the database of all the city trees. Last year we kind of going around and kind of came up with ideas for new planting sites," Dural said.

This year he had science classes go out into the community and put price tags on trees.

"This is the third stage of our project which is more of a community awareness on how valuable the trees are," Dural said.

This is a project Dural and his classes have been working with the community. Botanist and head of the city of Phillips Tree Committee Marjory Brzeskiewicz visited the students on Thursday.

"This is an expeditionary project where students learn outside of the class doing projects," Brzeskiewicz said.

Dural's work with the tree committee is what led to the start of the project.

"We got together and decided to apply for a grant through the state which we received $25,000," Dural said.

This money was spent on the equipment was used to do these interactive projects. For this part of the project, the students used an app called i-Tree.

"They can type in different parameters like what species, what the diameter is, where in relation to houses and buildings," said Dural.

This information is needed to figure out how much money the community saves with trees.

"Shading your house in the summertime reduces air conditioning costs," Dural said.

Dural hopes this project will help high-school students have a greater appreciation for the environment and the community they live in.

"I kind of felt like they are doing real-life work," Dural said.

The students enjoyed the experience as well.

"Well it's cold out today, but it's nice to get outside and not be stuck in a classroom falling asleep," said Philips High School junior Trey Kindle.

To find out how much the trees in your yard are worth, go to the i-Tree app. 

Related Weblinks:
i-Tree App

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