Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Wolves kill 17 prized sheep in Price County, leave farming couple to rebuildSubmitted: 06/24/2016
Ben Meyer
Ben Meyer
Managing Editor / Senior Reporter
bmeyer@wjfw.com

Wolves kill 17 prized sheep in Price County, leave farming couple to rebuild
BUTTERNUT - When sheep farmers Paul and Judy Canik checked on their pasture on the morning of May 31, their curiosity soon turned to shock.

Wolves had killed 17 of the couple's most valuable sheep. They had slaughtered 17 bighorn ewes.

"It was terrible to see them laying there dead like that, torn apart and stuff," Paul said. "They killed them all and never ate [anything]. Just killed them for the fun of it."


"It's almost like they just played with them," added Judy.

The couple has been married for 56 years, and has farmed their land near Butternut for 52 years. They had never seen anything like what they experienced that morning.

"It was just sickening, when you think of how they suffered," Judy said.

Last week, the DNR reported that Wisconsin's wolf population was the highest on record. But since a judge's ruling in 2014, wolves have been on the federal endangered species list, meaning lethal force is off the table to control the wolf population.

Bob Willging, who works SDA Wildlife Services' Rhinelander office, confirmed that the killings on the Canik farm were due to wolves.

"These [were] some of our main breeding stock, right here, for the future," Paul said.

All 17 were a variety of bighorn sheep, being raised to breed and give birth to more bighorns. The Caniks sell the bighorns to hunting clubs and game preserves across America, helping those organizations stock their lands for trophy hunters.

The Caniks' top rams sell for more than $5,000. The breeding ewes, killed by wolves, will cost more than $1,000 apiece to replace, according to Paul.

The DNR is in charge of determining the Caniks' compensation for the wolf killings. No matter what they get, they're still left with one feeling.

"[I'm] very angry, because we belong here, our sheep belong here, our guard dogs belong here," Judy said. "The wolves don't belong here."

"What I would like to see is if you got a group of wolves like is here, eliminate them," Paul added. "The others that stay where they belong and don't [create any] problems, I have no problem with them."

Now, the couple is left to rebuild its flock. And now, any time either Paul or Judy go to check on their sheep, they're wary.

"It's all of the time in your mind, because when we come down to check every morning, we're thinking, 'What are we going to find?" Judy said.

"It just makes our life miserable, is what it does," agreed Paul.

USDA Wildlife Services provided the Canik farm with electrified fencing to keep out wolves. Even so, Paul says he's far from completely confident it will prevent future attacks.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 08/19/2019

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:


We'll show you a new billboard in Merrill that the Holy Cross Sisters put up to call attention to the immigration humanitarian crisis. We'll also talk to the group about the project and the Vice Chairman of the Lincoln County Republican Party to get his reaction to the billboard.


We'll bring you this and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

+ Read More

MADISON - Two Native American tribes in Wisconsin are receiving federal grants for renewable energy projects that tribe members say will help reduce costs and lead to energy independence.

The Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in Odanah received a nearly $1 million grant, and the Forest County Potawatomi Community in Crandon got a grant for more than $1.5 million.

Wisconsin Public Radio reports the grants, announced last month, will be used to install solar panels at tribal buildings. The move is expected to save the tribes millions of dollars in energy spending over the next 25 years.

The Wisconsin tribes are among 12 nationwide that received a total of 14 grants from the federal Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs worth a total of $16 million.

+ Read More

MONROE, MICH. - Officials in one Michigan city are reviewing solutions to alleviate flooding from Lake Erie onto its streets.

Patrick Lewis is the city's head of engineering and public safety. He says strong winds have raised the lake's elevation several feet higher than normal on multiple occasions since spring.

Monroe News reports street flooding has been limited thanks to still backwaters. But Lewis says wave action could've led to significant damage to homes and structures along the shoreline.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says Lakes Erie and Ontario in June reached their highest points since record keeping began in 1918. Lewis says the levels are expected to stay at that point through the end of the year.


+ Read More

MILWAUKEE - Milwaukee police say a 12-year-old girl was shot when bullets struck her home.

The shooting happened early Sunday. Police say the girl was sitting on her bed when bullets entered her bedroom and struck her.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports police say the girl was struck more than once by the bullets, which were fired outside her home.

The girl was taken to a hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Police don't know who fired the gun and say the investigation continues.

+ Read More

MILWAUKEE - The Grafton School District is asking a federal court to overturn a decision by a state administrative law judge that forced it to pay $78,000 a year in tuition, plus expenses, to send a student to a boarding school that specializes in learning disabilities.

The Journal Sentinel reports the federal lawsuit argues that Judge Sally Pederson erred in July in finding that Grafton failed to provide a now 17-year-old student with the free and appropriate public education required by state and federal law.

Pederson's ruling stems from a yearslong battle between the district and the teen's mother who says he struggled with attention deficit, anxiety, dyslexia and other disorders.

Grafton Superintendent Jeff Nelson and the district's attorney, Andrew Phillips, declined to discuss the case.

+ Read More

MADISON -  A man who spent 25 years in prison for a 1992 homicide wants the state of Wisconsin to pay him nearly $6 million in compensation.

The state Claims Board is set to consider Derrick Sanders' demand for $5.7 million Thursday.

Sanders and two other men were convicted of homicide charges in 1993 in the shooting death of Jason Bowie in Milwaukee. Sanders pleaded no-contest to being party to first-degree intentional homicide.

But he later argued he didn't intelligently enter the plea because he didn't understand the potential for punishment, and a Milwaukee County circuit judge last year agreed and tossed out the plea. Prosecutors dropped the charges after that.

Sanders is now 48. State law limits compensation for wrongful convictions to $25,000, but Sanders is arguing for more.


+ Read More

AUSTIN, TEXAS - Former NFL and Texas running back Cedric Benson, one of the most prolific rushers in NCAA and University of Texas history, has died in a motorcycle accident in Texas. He was 36.

Benson's attorney, Sam Bassett, says Austin law enforcement told him that Benson was killed in a motorcycle accident Saturday night.

One of the top high school recruits in the country out of Midland, Texas, Benson was a key player in the Longhorns' resurgence under former coach Mack Brown. Benson played at Texas from 2001-2004. He won the Doak Walker award given to the nation's top running back in 2004.

Benson was drafted No. 4 overall by the Chicago Bears in 2005. He also played for the Cincinnati Bengals and Green Bay Packers.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: