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DNR may reorganize staff to address problems with water-quality monitoringSubmitted: 06/22/2016
DNR may reorganize staff to address problems with water-quality monitoring
Story By Associated Press

MADISON - Department of Natural Resources Secretary Cathy Stepp wants to reorganize the department as a way to address problems in the department's regulation of water pollution.

DNR officials said Wednesday at a Natural Resources Board meeting that short staffing and lax documentation led to many of the issues outlined in the Legislative Audit Bureau's report released in early June.

The audit found that the DNR hasn't been following its own policies or meeting its goals for policing pollution from large livestock farms and wastewater treatment plants.

Instead of asking for more funding, the department first plans to use a "core work analysis" it has been conducting to move staff and money to the areas that need it most, such as water quality management.

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