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Coyote hunt attention draws in big crowdsSubmitted: 01/23/2016
Story By Katie Thoresen

Coyote hunt attention draws in big crowds
ARGONNE - For a town of about 500 people, Argonne received a lot of attention this past week.

After wolf protection groups caught wind of a coyote hunting contest, they made it clear they didn't support such events.

But that didn't stop hunters. In fact, it had the opposite effect.


More than 100 people showed up to support the hunters.

"They had a good time. Very few coyotes were killed. The last tally I got was like two, three. It's not a deal of killing animals. The people were going to be doing that anyway," said hunter Ray Gryczkowski. "It's getting all together, having fun, and raising some money for the community, for the kids."

The hunt got so much publicity that people have been coming from all over to support it. 

"A lot of people came and donated today," said Gryczkowski. "They thought it was just terrific."

Even Senator Tom Tiffany came out to show his support.

"I think there are two things that are going on here. First, it's for a very good cause, the Crandon booster club," said Tiffany. "That other thing is that as sportsmen and women know you have to control predator populations, including coyotes. So it's a very good thing that they're doing to control those populations because otherwise they explode and get out of hand."

Not everyone feels this way. 

"I truly feel that there are better ways to raise money than to go out and kill coyotes and often times hunting predators," said Connemara McDonough with Friends of the Wisconsin Wolf. "The science doesn't back up the reasons people say they do it. By eliminating predators we're just throwing the whole thing off balance."

One of the main concerns groups like Friends of the Wisconsin Wolf had was that wolves would be accidentally shot during the hunt.

But hunters say that's highly unlikely.

"It's like mistaking a fawn for a full grown deer or anything else. We're hunters. If somebody does make that mistake they shouldn't be hunting," said Gryczkowski.

Gryczkowski said with all the attention the hunt received this has been the most successful fundraiser they've had and that makes it all worth it. 


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