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Hundreds march for women's rights in the NorthwoodsSubmitted: 01/21/2017
Story By Dakota Sherek

Hundreds march for women's rights in the Northwoods
MINOCQUA - Hundreds of thousands of people gathered in Washington D.C. today to promote gender equality. Here in the Northwoods, hundreds rallied in Minocqua for a similar reason. They showed their support for not just women's rights, but human rights. 

Not everyone could travel to D.C., so instead they held a Women's March in Minocqua.


"So we thought let's just start one of our own, right here in the Northwoods," said march organizer Beth Tornes.

Over 300 people joined the Women's March on Northwoods Wisconsin. Organizers were happy with the turnout.

"Surprised and thrilled, it's so exciting to see people come out to stand up for human rights," said march organizer Elisa Farmilant.

The demonstrators had to deal with some rain in the beginning, but they weren't deterred. 

"The weather wasn't the best but, you know the company was good," said Gary Bucheger. 

People who joined in had many different reasons for attending.

"I have three daughters and a beautiful wife, and that's the main reason, so I think this is great," said Bucheger. 

While marching, Pam Whipple carried the American flag upside down in the official sign of distress.

"I'm distressed about where the country is going, what's happening for women, what's happening for gay and lesbian people, what's happening for immigrants, what's happening for people of color, what's happening to religion," said Whipple. 

Organizers wanted the march to give community members a chance to speak their mind. 

"People who feel disenfranchised in the current environment that we just went through with the campaign. They feel left out and not invited to the table, and we want everyone's voice to be heard," said march organizer Judi Maloney. 

The march left many feeling hopeful. 

"I felt empowered. This is the first step. We will not be marginalized, we will not be dismissed," said Whipple.
Ultimately, the organizers wanted to send a simple message.

"We need to let the current administration know that we're going to fight for our rights, we're not going to stand idly by, we're gonna fight," said Tornes.






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