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Homecoming traditions continued Saturday at Camp RandallSubmitted: 11/12/2016
Story By Katie Leszcynski

Homecoming traditions continued Saturday at Camp Randall
MADISON - Saturday afternoon down in Madison, Badger fans came back to Camp Randall for homecoming.

One homecoming tradition is the law school cane toss that happens every year. Graduating law students throw a cane over the crossbar of the goal post and if they catch it on the other side, they supposedly will win their first case.

"This is the symbol of the end of our law school careers. It's really great because we get to do it all with our friends and it's one last celebration," said third-year law student Lexi Keyes.

For Keyes, she unfortunately didn't catch her cane.

"Ya know, it's not always about winning. I want to go into the criminal justice system and So for me it's more about justice than it is about winning or losing," said Keyes.

There are many rumors as to when the cane toss actually started, but it apparently dates back to around 1915.






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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 11/16/2018

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:


We'll update you on the traffic situation and the injuries following a morning head-on crash on Highway 8 between Rhinelander and Tomahawk.

We'll bring you tips on being safe this Thanksgiving both on the roads and in the kitchen.

And we'll take you live to Tomahawk for the annual venison feed and talk to a man from southern Wisconsin who brings his family to the event every year.



We'll bring you all this and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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RHINELANDER - Many people plan to fill their bellies this Thanksgiving with plenty of turkey.

However, local firefighters warn using turkey fryers can be one of the most dangerous cooking tools.

Rhinelander firefighter Luke Drummond said Thanksgiving keeps his team working around the clock.

"Thanksgiving is actually the busiest day of the year for structure fires," said Drummond. "Turkey fryers are a big thing. Obviously, oil and water don't mix. So, if you have that water in with your hot oil, there's going to be a reaction. And it's a pretty violent explosive reaction."

Drummond said you should never leave a fryer unattended.

Turkey fryer explosions can be massive and can expand at least two times its size every minute.


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WASHINGTON - The Republican-controlled House has passed a bill to drop legal protections for gray wolves across the lower 48 states, reopening a lengthy battle over the predator species.

Long despised by farmers and ranchers, wolves were shot, trapped and poisoned out of existence in most of the U.S. by the mid-20th century. Since securing protection in the 1970s, wolves have bounced back in the western Great Lakes states of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin, as well as in the Northern Rockies and Pacific Northwest.

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NORTHWOODS -  "This is a new thing for everybody," said DNR Deer Biologist Curt Rollman when talking about Chronic Wasting Disease.

He said the DNR deer needs some extra help this gun deer season.

"Last year in deer hunting season we had one deer test positive for Chronic Wasting Disease," said Rollman.

That deer was shot in northeast Lincoln County near Camp 10 Ski Hill.

Another deer with CWD was found less than two miles away in Oneida County during a special hunt in March. And one was found Thursday in Portage County.

Chronic Wasting disease or CWD is a deadly disease in the deer population.

"The DNR[ wants to start] working [with hunters] to see what this disease is all about in the Northwoods," said Rollman.

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RHINELANDER - LeRoy Eades began collecting supplies to send overseas to veterans 17 years ago.

At the beginning, he and his partner Ray Zastrow would just send a few boxes. 

But this year, with the help of Peoples State Bank, Eades will send 25 boxes to troops in Afghanistan for Christmas.

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ADAMS COUNTY - A Facebook Post from the Adams County Sheriff's Office says the remains of a man who was reported missing in June of 2017 have been identified.

The human remains found by deer hunters in the town of Monroe on October 20th this year were identified as William J. Sheeran.

Local and state investigators processed the area. 

No criminal activity is suspected in Mr. Sheeran's death.

No other information is being released at this time.

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MINOCQUA - Instead of working on the roads, members of the Minocqua Public Works crew hovered above Oneida Street on Thursday morning.

"We're all cross-trained and we all do everything throughout public works," DPW Director Mark Pertile said.

Pertile's talented team tested bulbs and planted a train set in front of the balsam Christmas tree in Veterans Park.  It was some of the final work to do before the "Island City" hits the holidays.

"Downtown is really starting to pop," Pertile said.

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