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St. Germain To Host First Ever 'Sunday Funday' Submitted: 07/03/2020
Story By Angela Kim

St. Germain To Host First Ever 'Sunday Funday'
Photos By St. Germain Chamber of Commerce

ST. GERMAIN - The St. Germain Chamber of Commerce is hosting the first ever 'Sunday Funday.' 

On Sunday, July 5th, there will be two bands: Flying Blind from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Tony Ocean 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

St. Germain's Chamber of Commerce Exec. Director Penny Strom said she wants this to be an opportunity for people to get outside while being safe.

"They can be outside, they can sit at picnic tables or they can bring their own chairs and set them up wherever they want to," said Strom. "The kids have stuff to do. It's a huge park, so they can just run around all day and get tired out."

There will also be a small craft fair, a bake sale during the day and events for kids to participate in..

Elsa from Frozen will make an appearance. Kids can also learn all about fire safety by trying out  a fire safety simulator.

Strom wants this to help families get outside while supporting musicians.

"For musicians, this is a great time because they've kind of been kind of shut out these last six months," said Strom. "So the musicians are happy to be out playing to a live crowd again. I just hope everyone comes out and enjoys it."

This event is scheduled to happen again in August with different bands. 


Related Weblinks:
St. Germain Chamber of Commerce

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There have been revisions to the mask mandate. Originally, it was said that only people not feeling well are required to wear it. It was changed when it was discovered that just talking could cause an outbreak.

Dr. Jeff Pothof of UW Madison Health spoke about how not wearing a mask can affect your long term health.

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Make sure to wash your cloth masks once a week and change paper masks once every three to 5 days.

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