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State senate passes first bill regarding dyslexia education in WisconsinSubmitted: 01/24/2020
Zack White
Zack White
Reporter
zwhite@wjfw.com

State senate passes first bill regarding dyslexia education in Wisconsin
RHINELANDER - The Wisconsin State Senate recently passed legislation to help dyslexic students across the state.

Assembly Bill 110 (AB 110) passed on the Senate floor earlier this week; it will now head to the desk of Gov. Tony Evers for a signature.

State Rep. Bob Kulp (R-Stratford) said the bill serves as a way to inform the public about dyslexia education.

"AB 110 is the first toe in the door to say we need to do something," said Kulp.

AB 110 would create a statewide guidebook for teachers and families of students with dyslexia. 

The guidebook would contain information on how to identify, assess and help dyslexic students.


Legislative Chair of the International Dyslexia Association of Wisconsin Donna Hejtmanek said AB 110 will debunk misunderstandings about dyslexia by educating teachers.

"In Wisconsin, our teachers are unprepared to identify the characteristics of dyslexia," said Hetjmanek. "It would benefit teachers to have that knowledge."

According to the National Center on Improving Literacy, Wisconsin will join 44 other states who have entertained dyslexia legislation. States like Idaho, South Dakota, Kansas, Michigan, Alaska and Hawaii still have no form of legislation in place.

Hejtmanek said she feels joy in her heart knowing Wisconsin is moving forward.

"I've had tears of joy this week," said Hejtmanek. "I'm going to cry now because this was 15 years of work."


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