Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Wisconsin's minimum wage remains among the lowest in the nationSubmitted: 01/02/2020
Peter Dubois
Peter Dubois
Reporter/Anchor
pdubois@wjfw.com

Wisconsin's minimum wage remains among the lowest in the nation
WISCONSIN - Millions of America's lowest paid workers got a raise on Jan. 1 when 20 states raised their minimum wage. Wisconsin was not one of them. The last time the Badger State passed a similar law was more than a decade ago.

Golden Harvest market owner Timothy Conjurske doesn't think the current minimum wage of $7.25 an hour is enough. He says he typically starts new employees at $10 per hour.

"We've always had it as our policy to pay our employees as much as we could," said Conjurske.


Conjurske doesn't believe in the concept of minimum wage. He thinks it should be up to businesses to fairly pay their employees.

"If states raise their minimum wage higher than they should be, putting them above the labor market, all they're going to do is raise the price of goods along with it," said Conjurske. "That's not going to put anyone in a better situation."

There are local resources available to help people in the Northwoods find better paying jobs. The job center offers skills training and information on local jobs in high-demand.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

WAUSAU - Michelle Neathery thought soap would be a retirement hobby.

Now it's her full-time job.

"I started to decide making this more of a business, coming back, selling to the public," Neathery said.

Neathery started making scented soaps on the side in 2003 while working other full-time jobs.

But after the United Health Group eliminated her department a few weeks ago, Neathery began devoting even more time to Little Bull Falls Soap Works.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Oneida County Health Department Director Linda Conlon confirmed the first case of COVID-19 in Oneida County. The individual is in their 20s with a known history of travel. According to Conlon, the patient has been compliant with instructions from health officials and is currently in isolation. 

We will have more details as they are made available by the county.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - The owner of a Rhinelander t-shirt shop is reminding people to support local businesses during the coronavirus pandemic.

+ Read More

Play Video

WAUSAU - It is difficult to predict how hard the coronavirus will hit Northern Wisconsin.

During a Friday press conference at Aspirus Wausau, Dr. Renee Smith said every hospital in the Aspirus system has facilities to manage coronavirus patients. In Wausau specifically, the health system recently created a specialized COVID-19 intensive care unit with negative pressure rooms to regulate air flow.

"We have capabilities throughout," said Smith. "So each of the facilities have their ability to manage that. And those patients will stay local if possible."

Dr. Smith wouldn't say exactly how many ventilators and ICUs are in the system - but did say they are in a "good position" and Aspirus is actively adding more.

"So the number [of ICUs and ventilators] is actually evolving," said Smith. "We can flex that number and we are identifying the areas where we can flex the number."

ICU and ventilator availability aren't the only things in flux.

"The testing prioritization is a changing situation," said Smith.

Dr. Smith outlined who is being tested by Aspirus.

There was a period where it was just health care workers with symptoms and hospitalized patients.

+ Read More

Play Video

NORTHWOODS -
Blood centers across the country saw thousands of cancelled blood drives and donations due to the Coronavirus pandemic.

The Community Blood Center of Wisconsin initially lost more than 700 units of blood the last two weeks but donations are now on the rise. 

"There's always going to be a need for blood whether we are in a pandemic or not," said Community Blood Center Chief Medical Officer Dr. Todd Straus.

Blood donations immediately halted with the rise of Coronavirus cases. Turns out, donating is one of the best ways to help out.

"We were looking at a really big shortage. In response we had to put out a big plea to our donors in the community to try and get in blood donors and I am pleased to say the community response has been wonderful," Straus said.

The local Community Blood Center donation surge was so large the blood centers started scheduling blood donation appointments two weeks out so supply stays stable.

"People are good-hearted individuals, especially in our state. Everyone wants to help out. It's just usually we don't think about it at the time but once we put out the message everyone responded greatly," Straus said.

With the high number of donors during the COVID-19 Pandemic, safety standards rose too.

"We've spaced out our appointment slots, making sure we don't have groups of people at the front door," Straus said.

"Everyone is spaced out from a time standpoint and we've also spaced people out physically in our donor centers so we can make sure the six-feet rules are in place," Straus said.

What's also important right now is that donors who have scheduled an appointment, to keep it.

"We know the need is there but it's not just going to be there today. It's going to be there in two weeks as well," Straus said.

The CBC hopes people remember that need for blood is year-round and there is no alternative way of getting this life-saving treatment. 

"I think people are looking for something to do to help. It's really hard to figure out what you can do to help when you have to stay in your home and this is something we are allowed to do. We are an essential community resource that we need to have. Blood donors have to come out and donate blood, we have no substitute for blood donors," Straus said.

+ Read More

Play Video

THREE LAKES - While schools across the state are closed down due to the COVID-19 pandemic, faculty and staff at the Three Lakes School District work hard to keep the student-body well-fed.

"We feed kids here," said Food Service Director Tina Halverson. "That's what I've done for 20 years. Now we're just doing it a little differently."

Staff deliver breakfasts and lunches to students around the district by bus.

"We have runners, we have packers, we have assemblers, we have extra helpers," said Halverson. "We have it down to a really good system right now."


+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - A local grocery chain is now getting some help to sanitize its carts and baskets. 

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: