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Appraisal expert featured on PBS's Antiques Roadshow stops in Phelps for antique critiqueSubmitted: 07/21/2019
Stephen Goin
Stephen Goin
Reporter/Anchor
sgoin@wjfw.com

Appraisal expert featured on PBS's Antiques Roadshow stops in Phelps for antique critique
PHELPS - An "antique critique" in Phelps Sunday helped people learn the value of their collectables, family heirlooms and thrift store finds with a little help from a familiar face. 

For the second year in a row, the Phelps Historical Museum brought out appraisal expert Mark Moran from PBS's Antiques Road Show for a four-hour long antiques valuation session.

Moran helped put a price tag on old paintings, clocks, glass ware, farm equipment, an antique bust, Native American rug and a flag from the 1876 World's Fair among other things. 

The flag's owner Nancy Steenport, also the Vice President of the Phelps Historical Museum, had a doll from her collection appraised at about $800. 

Like many others at event, Steenport said she didn't plan on selling her antiques after finding out what they were worth.

"Value is only important if you're going to try and sell it," said Steenport. "To me personal value is what I look at."

Steenport said a Native American costume that belongs to the museum was also appraised for insurance purposes. She added that many of Sunday's attendees may be looking to insure their antiques and knowing an item's relative value is the first step in that process. 

Sunday's high ticket item was a baseball signed by Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. It was appraised at more than $8,000 and its owner plans to keep it in the family. 
 
People in Phelps who believe they have items of value are encouraged to have them appraised. Steenport says the museum will accept certain antiques from locals who wish to have them preserved.

"We have received many many items from local people who want to know specifically that item is going to stay in the community and in good hands" said Steenport.


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