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Prosecutors charge CNA with additional sexual assault count after second victim comes forward at Minocqua facilitySubmitted: 03/26/2019
Prosecutors charge CNA with additional sexual assault count after second victim comes forward at Minocqua facility
Story By Lane Kimble

RHINELANDER - Two days after police started investigating a certified nursing assistant on allegations he sexually assaulted a patient, a second patient came forward saying the same CNA assaulted them too.

Prosecutors charged Jacob Schlosser, 18, with a third count of second-degree sexual assault in Oneida County Court on Monday.

According to the amended criminal complaint, a 94-year-old resident at Avanti Health and Rehabilitation in Minocqua told a nursing supervisor on March 22 that Schlosser sexually assaulted the victim during a bath one week prior.


The victim told a detective Schlosser did not use a washcloth while bathing their genitals, then proceeded to fondle the victim.

The victim did not immediately report the assault because they felt embarrassed and uncomfortable, according to police.  Avanti records show March 15, the day of the alleged assault, was Schlosser's first day bathing patients without supervision.

According to the Minocqua Police Department report, Avanti administration held a meeting with residents after Schlosser was first arrested, encouraging people to report any other assaults.  Staff did not share specific details about the defendant or victim with residents at that time.

Schlosser, who just received his CNA license on March 4, was first charged with two counts of second-degree sexual assault on March 21.

In the initial case, police believe Schlosser sexually assaulted an 80-year-old victim who has dementia during a bath.

A witness reported that assault to police after she said Schlosser told her about it. In MPD's report, Schlosser told the witness he did not think the victim would remember the assault due to the Alzheimer's.  A follow up interview between police and the 80-year-old victim revealed they could not state what year it is, who the president is, or where they live.

The 94-year-old victim told police they felt badly for not reporting the March 15 assault sooner because the other assault might not have otherwise happened.  The victim added both male and female CNA at Avanti had generally treated them with respect prior to Schlosser.

Police interviewed two of Schlosser's trainers who said they taught the defendant to always use a washcloth while bathing patients.  They added Schlosser would not have passed his certification test had he not used a washcloth.

Avanti's Assitant Director of Nursing Jessica Pultz told police she had never received a similar complaint in her eight years with the facility until the accusations against Schlosser.

Schlosser had initially been free on a $5,000 signature bond, but Judge Patrick O'Melia set a $2,000 cash bond on Monday after the new charge was filed.

Schlosser now faces up to 120 years in prison if convicted. He is due back in court March 29.


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