Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Oneida County becomes 50th county in Wisconsin asking state to 'Just Fix' roadsSubmitted: 09/20/2016
Oneida County becomes 50th county in Wisconsin asking state to 'Just Fix' roads
Story By Ben Meyer

RHINELANDER - On Tuesday, Oneida County became the 50th of Wisconsin's 72 counties asking the state to "Just Fix It."

The "Just Fix It" campaign is a push from the state's Transportation Development Association. It's asking the state government to raise more money to repair and maintain roads.

"This resolution is saying how the state wants to do that is up to them," Oneida County Board Supervisor Robb Jensen said. "But do something. Don't keep doing the same old, same old, because we're going to continue to fall farther and farther behind."


Options for raising more money include increasing the gas tax, raising registration fees, or putting tolls on some roads in Wisconsin.

But that effort could stop short on Gov. Scott Walker's desk.

"The one area where I draw the line is, I made a firm pledge to the voters that I would not raise the gas tax and fees associated with transportation," he said last week in Plover. "I respect those who disagree with me, but that's a pledge I made."

In addition to 50 counties, more than 350 cities, towns, and villages have signed on to the "Just Fix It" movement in Wisconsin.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

ATHELSTANE - Children from the Northwoods learned how to hunt deer and sing along to Native American drums.

+ Read More

GREEN BAY - The Packers welcomed Oakland to the cheese-state for an early non-division clash.

+ Read More

Play Video

WAUSAU - Smokey Bear serves as a national safety symbol.

One farm in Wausau dedicated ten acres of land to celebrating Smokey's 75th birthday this year.

Willow Springs Garden takes pride in its annual corn maze.

People who came this October got to spend about 45 minutes walking through a giant Smokey Bear.

Volunteers said it takes a lot of planning to make their field of dreams a reality.

"It takes a good year to get it planned out," said volunteer Meghan Walters. "What's going to be our theme? Once the weather turns nice, [we plan] how are we going to plant the corn, who's planting the corn, and then how are we going to create the maze."

The regular corn maze season ended Sunday.

However, Willow Springs will transform it into a haunted corn maze this week.

+ Read More

WESTON - Over 500 athletes with intellectual disabilities competed in this years R-2 Regional Bowling Tournament.

The event featured teams from Central and Western Wisconsin.

Amber Weinfurter, the athletic director of the event says she most impressed by the high level of sportsmanship among the athletes.

"To see the expression and the excitement and them cheering on people not only on their team," said Weinfurter. "It's the sportsmanship that is fantastic that you see at special Olympics is fantastic because they want to do their best and cheer everybody on."

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Women in the Northwoods should go to the doctor often to make sure they are in good health.

+ Read More

Play Video

MINOCQUA - Dozens came to the Northwoods Wildlife Center's open house Saturday afternoon.

It's the only day of the year the center gives tours of its rehabilitation facilities.

During these tours, people learned about the process of nursing wild animals back to health.

"We're not a zoo so unless they're non-releasable we aren't socializing with them at all," said wildlife rehabilitator Amanda Walsh. "We're making sure they're clean, providing good care for them, but we're not schmoozing with them. We're just making sure they have what they need and we'll go from there."

Tour guides brought groups outside where animals were getting re-accustomed to life outdoors.

Executive director Mickey Mueller explained why it's important for these animals to have minimal human contact.

"They came in here as wild animals and when they're released we want them to thrive and survive without human contact, without humans feeding them," said Mueller. "That they're able to get along on their own."

Mueller said the best part about her job is seeing rehabilitated animals released back into the wild where they belong.

Although Saturday was the only chance to see rehab animals, people can always come to learn more about the facility or check out the birds of prey tour.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Children from all over the Northwoods gathered in Rhinelander for some new seasonal activities.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: