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Minimum hunting age droppedSubmitted: 11/13/2017
Ryan Sandberg
Ryan Sandberg
Meteorologist/News Producer
rsandberg@wjfw.com

Minimum hunting age dropped
WOODRUFF - Anyone, age one to 100 and beyond, can now hunt in Wisconsin.

Gov. Walker signed a bill that eliminates a minimum age requirement to hunt in Wisconsin.


The bill went into effect Monday, just days away from the gun-deer season opener.

Previously, the law required that a child must be at least 10 years old to participate in a mentored hunt.

The new law now allows anyone, regardless of their age, to participate in a mentored hunt.

People opposed to the bill were concerned about safety.

"That was a concern, with people that weren't supportive of the change, you know, was the safety factor behind it. But again, thirtysome other states have either a no minimum hunting age requirement or lower than Wisconsin's, and they have not seen problems," said DNR conservation warden supervisor David Walz.

Parents and guardians will now have more of a say as to when their children are ready to hunt.

The young hunters will still need to go with a mentor hunter who also has a valid hunting license, and they need to stay within arm's reach of each other.

"The traditional law that we had in place for the last couple years required an arm's reach," Waltz said. "That is still in effect yet."

Both the mentor and mentee can carry a weapon.

Wisconsin is now the 35th state to drop the minimum age required to hunt.


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