Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Ashlee Martinson's attempt to reduce 23-year prison sentence deniedSubmitted: 09/13/2017
Ben Meyer
Ben Meyer
Managing Editor / Senior Reporter
bmeyer@wjfw.com

Ashlee Martinson's attempt to reduce 23-year prison sentence denied
RHINELANDER - Ashlee Martinson will stay in prison for two more decades after a court ruling in Rhinelander on Wednesday.

Martinson shot her stepfather and stabbed her mother to death in Oneida County two years ago, when she was 17.

On Wednesday, Martinson's lawyer, Mark Schoenfeldt, tried to get her 23-year prison sentence reduced through a motion called post-conviction relief. Schoenfeldt argued Judge Michael Bloom made an error in sentencing Martinson. Bloom said Martinson had a choice of whether to kill her parents.


"When this fateful day occurred, her choice was completely nullified by the fact that she didn't have any control," Schoenfeldt said.

Schoenfeldt alluded to Martinson's brutal home life. He said prolonged abuse and distress caused her to lose control in the moment.

"This was not a normal 17-year-old that came before the court," he argued. "Ms. Martinson's life had been fraught with physical, sexual, mental, emotional distress. Her life was basically a horror story."

Bloom cited case law, state statute, and legal opinions in denying the motion to reduce Martinson's sentence.

"The Court did not abuse its discretion [in the sentencing] and the defendant's motion, that I find as such, is denied," he said.

Wednesday's hearing was just the first stop in the appeals process for Martinson.

"I would anticipate that this gets appealed to the next level," said Oneida County District Attorney Michael Schiek. "This is really kind of the stepping stone to make that happen."

Schoenfeldt confirmed he planned to argue the case to the Court of Appeals, mentioning he might later take it to the state Supreme Court if needed. Schoenfeldt believes a prison sentence closer to eight years, with Martinson's trial lawyers recommended, would be more appropriate.

"That's the range that I thought it should have been in," he said.

Martinson listened to Wednesday's hearing via phone from Taycheedah Correctional Center in Fond du Lac, the prison where she lives. Barring a successful appeal, she will be in prison until age 40 and on extended supervision until age 57.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

MADISON - A person who hits age 15 might soon be able to work as a lifeguard in Wisconsin.

The state Senate considers a bill to allow it Tuesday.

Current rules prohibit those ages 14 and 15 from working as lifeguards.

+ Read More

MADISON - The Senate will put the finishing touches on a bill to help Wisconsin homeowners cover the cost of replacing lead pipes.

It would let public water utilities and local governments provide grants and loans to property owners.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - A jury of eight men and six women will decide whether a 30-year-old Wisconsin man is guilty of a 2011 shooting near Three Lakes.

The trial against Edwin Hughes started Monday morning in Oneida County Court.

Prosecutors accuse Hughes of three felonies tied to a botched armed robbery seven years ago. That attempted robbery ended with the victim alive, but shot in the knees.

Police believe Hughes and Daniel Frausto broke into the home of Donald DalPonte in February 2011, seeking to steal his money. DalPonte owned Weasel's, a gentleman's club in Three Lakes, at the time.

+ Read More

MERRILL - A Merrill pastor critically injured in a car crash near Rhinelander this month died Monday afternoon.

According to a post from his wife on a family-created CaringBridge page, James Weiland died at 2:20 p.m.

Weiland, 58, was hurt in a crash on Highway 8 several miles west of Rhinelander around 1 p.m. on Jan. 12.  His pickup truck crashed with a semi-truck, which led to a 4 1/2-hour closure of the highway.  Medics took Weiland from the scene in an ambulance before airlifting him to Aspirus Wausau Hospital.  The semi-truck driver was not hurt.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - The Oneida County Sheriff says that being in jail is a constant battle with boredom. Inmates can watch TV, play cards, and message their families but that's about it. Now, thanks to a new program, inmates can work towards getting a high school education.

The Oneida County jail recently paired up with Nicolet Technical College to create a GED certification program for some of its inmates. The program is designed to set inmates up for success once they are released from jail.

A teacher from Nicolet College comes to the jail four times a week for about an hour to teach nine state inmates. Although the program is open to county and state inmates, there are only state inmates involved at this time.

+ Read More

ONEIDA COUNTY - The Oneida County Highway Department spent most of the morning preparing for the winter weather parts of the state are expecting to see. 

Highway Commissioner Bruce Stefonek to get an update as to what the highway department has been doing to prepare. 

+ Read More

MADISON - A Wisconsin tribe is suing the federal government in hopes of blocking a proposed gold mine in Michigan's Upper Peninsula.

Aquila Resources Inc. wants to dig the so-called Back Forty mine on the Menominee River but needs a state permit to fill wetlands.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here