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Ponsse showcases new logging machinery for Northwoods loggers Submitted: 08/08/2014
Story By Adam Fox


RHINELANDER - America will welcome a new type of logging machine. Ponsse showcased its Scorpion King Friday morning in Rhinelander.

The nearly 50,000 lb. machine is the company's first with a 360 degree cutting turret.

Company leaders say that gives operators the chance to grab any tree within reach without having to move its base.

"People want more and more efficient machines, but the operators want to have more comfort because comfortably also brings you more productivity," Antti Rasanen Ponsse Marketing Manager said. "The operator can be fresh and productive the whole day, which makes a big difference after a year or a month."

The Scorpion King has already been introduced in a handful of European countries, including Finland, Sweden, Germany, France and Great Britain. Rasanen says the tree cutter can be used practically anywhere.

"We can go to soft terrain; we can go to steep hills or just flat surfaces. It doesn't matter. It does really well on uneven, rough terrains over steep ditches," Rasanen said.

The company hopes to sell the product in logging areas across the US. They believe the product will do well in America because of the improved visibility it gives operators.

"Well basically it's the working technique, it's completely free. You see a tree; you can take it no matter where it's pointing. So it's visibility and the working technique." Rasanen said.

The frame of the machine has rotating joints, which help keep the middle frame, and cab, hydraulically level.

The machine also can tackle the majority of logging jobs.

"Of course if we go really big ones, big trees, then you need a one-step bigger machine, but other than that, for a general purpose idea, this is perfect for most conditions," Rasanen said.

Ponsse hosted more than 600 people Friday for the demonstration. Leaders for the company say it was the largest demonstration they have hosted in Rhinelander.


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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 04/27/2017

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

Rain, sleet and snow led to at least three accidents this morning near Rhinelander today. We'll give you the details and talk to a Rhinelander police officer about how to avoid accidents in weather like today.

We'll tell you how the recent precipitation is affecting lake levels in the Northwoods.

And an acoustic guitarist from Japan is opening the season at Three Lakes Center for the Arts Friday, and this will be his second time performing there. He tells us why he likes playing in that particular theater.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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MADISON - A top psychologist at Wisconsin's troubled youth prison was fired for allegedly ignoring the requests of dozens of inmates who asked for help.

Records obtained by The Associated Press show Dr. D. Jeremy John was accused in December of not following up with 26 youth inmates at the Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake prison facility.

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MILWAUKEE - A Wisconsin man was removed from a Delta Air Lines flight after using the bathroom against crew instructions shortly before takeoff.

Kima Hamilton says he urgently needed to use the bathroom April 18 while on a Milwaukee-bound plane in Atlanta. He says takeoff was delayed and the flight wasn't moving, so he decided to go.

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MADISON - The state Department of Justice, federal authorities and police are urging people to get rid of unwanted medications this weekend.

The DOJ, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and local police departments have set up a drug take back day on Saturday.

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TOMAHAWK - Unless you find yourself in trouble, you don't usually sit down and talk with a cop. 

The Tomahawk Police Department held its monthly Coffee with a Cop meeting Wednesday morning.

It gives people the chance to pull up a chair and talk to Chief Al Elvins about their questions or concerns.

Those concerns change with the season. 

Warmer weather means kids will be out of school soon and there'll be more foot traffic.
 
And don't forget about those motorcycles. 

"Watch out for the motorcycles. So often they hit a blind spot on us and you don't see them. If you are driving a bike, be aware of your surroundings. Remember that four wheels don't always see your two wheels," said Chief Elvins. 

The city's drug takeback will be open all day on Saturday. The department does it twice a year.

You can bring in any over the counter or prescription drugs to the station's drop-off box.


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RHINELANDER - Rent can eat up more than half of a person's income when they earn minimum wage. That can lead to missed rent payments and even homelessness.

The Northern Wisconsin Initiative to Stop Homelessness, or N*WISH, wants to work the landlords to keep people housed.

"This is a new initiative, I guess, to try to build landlord relationships and awareness of homelessness and people in need," said Housing Program team leader Lori Hallas.

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VILAS COUNTY - Day three of the trial for Rodney Teets brought a variety of witnesses to the stand.

The 36-year-old Vilas County man is accused of three counts of sexual assault.

Wednesday began with testimony from a slew of law enforcement.

Each of them went over the night the woman accusing Teets of sexual assault called 9-1-1 .

Prosecutors showed the clothes police believe Teets was wearing that night and showed the knife police found in the pocket.

It is unclear if this is the same knife with which investigators believe Teets threatened the woman.

Next, the court heard from the sexual assault nurse examiner, or SANE nurse, who examined the woman in the case.

The nurse read from her report that night, referring to the woman as "the patient."

"The patient appears alert, awake, cooperative, tearful," the SANE nurse testified.

Defense attorney Steven Lucareli asked the SANE nurse if she noticed the woman was hurt.

"No physical injuries whatsoever, whether violent or not?" Lucareli asked. The nurse confirmed this was true.

Then, a DNA analyst from the state crime lab testified she found Teets's DNA from the samples the SANE nurse sent to her.

Lucareli pointed out that the analyst couldn't say how the DNA might have gotten there.

"The DNA doesn't tell us anything about whether a rape occurred?" Lucareli asked. The analyst confirmed this was true.

Prosecutors will call their last two witnesses Thursday, including the main detective in the case. Then the defense will begin presenting its argument.

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