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NEWS STORIES

Study: using an aspirin a day could reduce chances of cancer, some risk Submitted: 08/07/2014

Adam Fox
10 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
afox@wjfw.com


ACROSS THE US - A new study from the Queen Mary University of London shows aspirin may reduce your chances of getting cancer in your digestive tract.

The research released this week found that taking aspirin for 10 years could cut bowel cancer deaths by 40 percent.

The study looked at people between 50 and 65 taking the drug. They would need to take 75 to 100 milligrams of aspirin a day for at least five years to see the benefit, but health leaders say that benefit does come with risk.


"There would be a risk of bleeding. You could have bleeding internally, too, if you were taking things that cause blood-thinning," said Oneida County Public Health Nurse Dawn Klink.

A daily dose would increase the risk of digestive tract bleeding by about two percent. Klink says aspirin was originally made to help with pain, but doctors found out it works as a blood thinner.

Health leaders say the pill should be used on a case-by-case basis for patients.

"You have to weigh that for themselves, and like I said, every person is different. No two people are the same, and it depends a lot on the person's family history," Klink said.

Nurses say you should ask your doctor before starting any medication. Doctors say the best way to prevent getting cancer is to avoid or stop smoking.

A link to the research is below.


Related Weblinks:
Aspirin Research Study

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