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New summer art programSubmitted: 07/11/2014
Story By Matt Brooks


RHINELANDER - Two art groups will come together to offer art classes to kids this summer. Leaders of both groups feel more children need to express themselves artistically. Old School and ArtStart will offer a kid-friendly art program every Friday through August 15th.

"Having an opportunity to meet some of the volunteers of the volunteers and folks from over there, we decided on some collaboration with the program that we're doing and some of the artists that work there as well," says Old School Learning Administrator Louise Perrault. "They have some ideas that are really suitable to working with kids."

The program is intended for children 7 or older. The kids will focus on paper craft projects, including trading cards and altered books. Program leaders say that there has been a lot of interest in the class. There is still more room for kids to join the program.

"We're bringing kids over from Old School and we run 12 to 15 kids," says Perrault. "We have had some other families that have been calling us, and some were maybe just coming in the one time, but we could take 20 kids or even more. We'll find a way to squeeze everybody in that wants to join us."

Anyone can sign up for the classes, just contact Louise at 715-420-0300.


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