Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Camp visiting weekend brings business to NorthwoodsSubmitted: 07/11/2014
Story By Lauren Stephenson


NORTHWOODS - You may notice more people on the roads, lakes, at restaurants, and in stores the next few weekends. Many overnight camps in the Northwoods host a visiting weekend for their campers' families, and that means big money for local businesses.

"We're talking thousands of parents invading Minocqua, and Rhinelander and Eagle River throughout the weekend," said Camp Kawaga Director Matt Abrams.

There are more than 20 overnight camps in Vilas and Oneida Counties, and at least half host a visiting weekend. That's when parents come up to visit their kids spending the summer at an overnight camp. Though they visit camp, parents and campers spend a lot of time in the community.

"Really, most of the time they're out," added Abrams. "They're going to dinner. They're going go-carting."

"Camp weekend really is a special weekend. We can count on the store being packed to the walls with people. And they're a very good crowd," said Michael Johnson, manager of Dan's Minocqua Fudge.

The store has been welcoming campers and their families for 47 years.

"Every year we have people that stop in here at the store and will tell us a nice story of how they came here when they were a camp kid or when they came here with their grandparents and now they're bringing their grandchildren here," Johnson added.

Like Dan's Minocqua Fudge, The White Stag Inn in Sugar Camp also sees a larger crowd on visiting weekend. The owners say they'll serve more than 500 people in just a five hour period. It's a popular restaurant among visiting families and camp alumni.

"We are seeing multi-generations. So my brothers and I are now the third generation here at the White Stag and we're seeing the third and fourth generation of campers. So it's really kind of a unique experience to have grown up not only with the parents, but now having their kids and grandkids here," said White Stag Inn co-owner Anissa Widule.

Restaurants and shops aren't the only businesses that get a boost from visiting weekend.

"These parents are booking the hotels a year ahead because they know they're coming the next year so this is a consistent boon for the Minocqua area," Abrams said.

But the business boom doesn't necessarily end on Sunday.

"We've had families that have ended up buying second homes up here," Abrams added. "The other thing that a lot of them do is they rent homes."

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

RHINELANDER - It seemed like Rhinelander could finally start looking for a new city administrator. But the City Council will now consider another option, one that could potentially create a longer wait to fill an important job.

+ Read More

RHINELANDER - Many Northwoods hunters think the DNR's baiting and feeding ban doesn't work as intended. Some actually think it's hurting the deer herd.

At the beginning of 2016, the DNR banned baiting and feeding in Oneida, Vilas, and Forest counties.

That's because a deer was found with chronic wasting disease in Three Lakes. Now, hunters and the DNR want to find a way to stop the spread.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Even with snow on the ground, people in the Northwoods can start preparing for their perfect summer wedding. Lund and Taylor Bridal Gallerie hosts its annual Magic Moments Bridal Expo in Rhinelander this Saturday.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - Take salvaged metal and wood, hand it to one Eagle River artist, and watch his imagination come to life.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - Patti Underhill spends her days crafting.

"Basically I like to sew," she said. "When I was young, I made my own Barbie doll clothes and my mom showed me how to sew."

It's a hobby that--now in her retirement--is paying off for Underhill in small ways. She is one of 29 vendors who volunteers her time to work in the Eagle River Serve Senior Craft Shop. Vendors keep 70 percent of the profits, and the other 30 percent goes back to the shop or includes sales tax.

+ Read More

Play Video

TOMAHAWK - High schoolers in Tomahawk sat across from local business professionals on Wednesday, answering questions in an interview setting.

The mock interview event is one of many that high school teacher Olivia Dachel helped create. Earlier this month, Gov. Scott Walker honored Dachel and 14 other Wisconsin people and organizations with a Governor's Financial Literacy Award.

+ Read More

MOLE LAKE - When you drive through Mole Lake, you'll notice a lot of solar panels.

It's part of a project tribal leaders have worked on for more than a year, and they hope it will save the community a lot in energy costs.

Tribal leaders applied and received a couple million dollars in grants from the U.S. Energy Department and the Housing and Urban Development Department. Then they started working with a Pewaukee-based company called SunVest Solar, Inc., and started installing the panels on homes and businesses in 
September.

Now, they are almost done.

According to SunVest Solar, this is the largest per capital solar array installation in the Midwest. Tribal Administrator Jeff Ackley, Jr., says 50 homes and 17 businesses have solar panels.

"Most of the state of Wisconsin has less than one percent of its generation coming from solar and now you have a community where almost 50 percent of the homes get their power from the sun," said Adam Gusse, head of operations at SunVest Solar, Inc.

"I thought it would put us on the map," Ackley said.

Project leaders think the panels can produce up to 85 percent of power in homes and between 20 and 60 percent for businesses.

"It will be significant savings all around for the community," Ackley said. "From rough crunchings of numbers we're looking at probably saving between $60,000 and $80,000 per year on energy usage."

The first batch of panels turned on in November, and some people say they've already seen the savings.

"Some are seeing up to $100 in savings just after that first month," Gusse said. "So they'll see much more per month savings as they go on."

Gusse said the panels don't produce as much power in the winter as they will in the summer, but residents still save money.

Tribal leaders can apply for more grants to put panels on more homes. 

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here