Loading
An unknown error occurred:
XMLNode
Container/Path Not Found:
xml_var1


An unknown error occurred:
XMLNode
Container/Path Not Found:
xml_var1

An unknown error occurred:
XMLNode
Container/Path Not Found:
xml_var1


42°F

46°F

43°F

46°F

43°F

46°F

43°F

46°F
NEWS STORIES

UPDATE: Merrill man gets life sentence, opportunity to petition after 33 years; still says he's innocentSubmitted: 07/03/2014

Adam Fox
10 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
afox@wjfw.com

Play Video

MERRILL - A 50-year-old Merrill man will spend at least 33 years in prison after being sentenced Thursday. A jury found Mark Bucki guilty in April of three counts connected to the murder and disappearance of his wife Anita.

The jury found Bucki guilty of three charges including first degree intentional homicide, strangling a person and hiding a body. The homicide charge was the most significant count determining Bucki's sentence because it carries a mandatory life sentence, but that doesn't guarantee spending life in prison.

Under state law, a mandatory life sentence carries a minimum of 20 years in prison, with the chance to petition for extended supervision afterwards. The extended supervision isn't guaranteed and would be determined by judicial leaders in the future after the minimum time in prison is met.

After more than two hours of statements, Judge Jay Tlusty sentenced Bucki to life in prison with a chance to petition after 35 years. Bucki won't get to petition for extended supervision until May 2048, after adding credit for time already served in county jail.

Judge Tlusty also sentenced Bucki to three years of prison and four years of extended supervision for the two remaining counts. Lincoln County District Attorney Donald Dunphy wanted Bucki to be sentenced to life in prison without the chance to petition, but he ultimately agrees with the sentence.

"35 years is a long time, and Mr. Bucki will be 84 or 85 by that time," Dunphy said.

Anita Bucki's family also wanted Mark Bucki to spend the rest of his life in prison without the chance for a petition. Her brother, Cliff Brown, made that clear in a letter that was read to the court.

"He deserves to pay for what he has done, he deserves to rot in a cell until the day he dies, then find a ditch and throw him in it like he did to my sister," Brown wrote in his statement.

However Mark and Anita's son, Clint, was hoping for leniency from Judge Tlusty. He has said multiple times throughout the case that his father was innocent, so he was hoping for a minimum sentence.

"I'm afraid something might happen to him while he's in there, and I won't be around to say good bye. Your honor, I need my papup, Alauna (Clint's daughter) needs her grandpa and I urge you to give my dad leniency." Clint Bucki said.

When given the opportunity to comment before the sentencing, Mark Bucki took the opportunity to say all he wanted was the best for Anita, and that he still loved her.

"If I could say I'm sorry for all of this, I would, because it would put so many people at rest," Bucki said. "But I can't because I am innocent."

Anita's sister Cheryl Cruse also spoke before the sentencing. She discussed her relationship with her sister and how Anita was always a rock to the family. Cruse says she'll still feel a void regardless of the decision.

"If only I could rewind the clock, I would gladly take the pain and suffering my sister endured during the last night of her life, just to have her back," Cruse said.

Prosecutors say Bucki plans on appealing the sentence.

If the sentence stands, Bucki would be in his mid-80's when he could petition for extended supervision, but Anita's family won't get the same second chance to see her again.

"My hard lessoned learned in this is to never leave things unsaid because you never know when it will be too late," Cruse said.

Judge Tlusty said that might be a positive lesson both families could take from the case.

The sentencing means Bucki will spend the rest of his life under the Wisconsin Correction Department's supervision.

--------------------------------------------------
July 3, 2014; 1:05 p.m.

A Lincoln County man convicted of killing his wife and hiding her body will spend at least 35 years in prison.

Thursday, a judge told 50-year-old Mark Bucki he could petition the court for release with extended supervision after serving 35 years in prison. Judicial leaders then would decide if he was fit to be released into the extended supervision program. He will spend the rest of his life somehow connected to the Wisconsin corrections system. Bucki could get credit for time served in county jail, reducing the time spent to 33 year in prison.

Bucki was convicted of first degree murder, hiding a body and strangling his wife, Anita.

The first degree murder charge carries a mandatory life sentence.

Newswatch 12's Adam Fox was in the courtroom. He'll bring you more information tonight on Newswatch 12.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS
A unique way to view the stars Submitted: 10/19/2014

Play Video

MONICO - People living in the Northwoods get the chance to see dozens of stars on a clear night, but with the temperatures dropping, it might not be as enjoyable.

A planetarium in Monico gives you that experience without bone chilling temperatures.

Kovac Planetarium in Monico has been in business since 2007. It took the owner 10 years to build it. 5 to put the planetarium together. Then an additional 5 to actually get it inside.

The owner says when people come to his planetarium, most people don't know what to expect.

+ Read More
Voters head to polls early in WisconsinSubmitted: 10/19/2014

Play Video

MADISON - Wisconsin residents can start heading to their local clerks' offices this week to cast early ballots for the Nov. 4 election.

Early voting is set to begin Monday and run through Oct. 31. Municipal clerks can hold early voting from 8 a.m. until 7 p.m. Monday through Friday during those two weeks, although each clerk can set his or her own hours. Clerks without regular office hours must make themselves available by appointment.

+ Read More
Wisconsin park begins cutting dead treesSubmitted: 10/19/2014

MADISON - Workers have started removing nearly 140 dead or dying evergreen trees at Peninsula State Park Golf Course in Door County.

The Department of Natural Resources says a 2011 application of a broadleaf herbicide damaged the trees. The agency says federal environmental officials had approved the herbicide but later stopped its sale after determining it damages evergreen trees.

+ Read More
Madison police arrest 1 for urinating on squad carSubmitted: 10/19/2014

MADISON - A Wisconsin man has been arrested for allegedly urinating on a marked Madison Police Department squad car.

A police statement says officers observed the 21-year-old Dodgeville man relieving himself on the squad car late Saturday night near a bar on State Street in downtown Madison. It says several people warned the man that police were approaching, but he didn't stop.

+ Read More
100-year-old grandmother sees six generations in one settingSubmitted: 10/19/2014

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Most people don't get to meet their great, great, great grandchildren. It's one of the perks one Rhinelander woman has after turning 100 years old. All six generations of her family got together Sunday to celebrate their unique family.

"I wouldn't let anything ever happen to you," said 100-year-old, Bea Kofler.

Kofler held her nine day old great, great, great grandson for the first time Sunday.

"He's too precious," Kofler said.

+ Read More
Humane Society takes in more than 60 cats, two dogsSubmitted: 10/19/2014

Play Video

TAYLOR COUNTY - More than 60 cats and kittens will need to be nursed back to health. They were found in a home filled with garbage and junk.

The Taylor County Humane Society got the cats and two dogs last week after their owner passed away. The humane society says the animal's owner can be described as an animal hoarder.

Many of the cats are sick, hungry, and very weak.

+ Read More
Police and fire personnel train for real life situations Submitted: 10/18/2014

Play Video

WABENO - Texting and driving can lead to serious and deadly accidents. That's why students in Wabeno put together a real life situation involving drinking and texting while driving Saturday.

Students in Family Career Community Leaders of America at Wabeno High School put this together to strengthen surrounding areas of rescue fire agencies.

They want teenagers to be more aware of distracted driving.

"It was a big deal for all of us. That's why we were focusing on high school students playing the part of victims or younger, even elementary, middle school students," said 17-year-old Kaitlyn Ashbeck. "That way they can see what happens when they're not being a safe driver."

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here