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Pushing for springSubmitted: 04/14/2014
Story By Karolina Buczek


RHINELANDER - The snow can't stop some people from preparing for spring.

Despite the weather, some local hardware stores have more customers buying spring products like flowers.

Some stores are pushing spring items because they want to help their customers move on from winter.

"We're into spring. We're getting ready for summer. Despite what it may look like outside, we're pushing to get the spirit of warmth," said Don Pelkowski, an employee at Rhinelander Home Depot.

Some stores have already sold out of vegetable plants.

They believe people are excited to start gardening because they're sick of the cold.

Even though there is snow on the ground, not many people have been coming in for snow supplies.

Some stores don't have any more winter supplies in stock.

"We haven't has any shovels or roof rakes in about a month and a half. We have about a half dozen bags of winter salt left and we have one snow blower that was returned to us. Other than that, our winter stuff is pretty well gone," said Pelkowski.

Employees expect more people to buy spring plants when their next shipment comes in.

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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 03/30/2017

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

Every year, the federal government puts almost a half-billion dollars into public radio and television. But in his preliminary budget proposal earlier this month, President Trump pushed for cutting all of that funding. Tonight we talk to managers of public radio stations in Wausau and Rhinelander about how those cuts would affect their stations.

We'll tell you about a plan that would turn a former Rhinelander nursing home building into student housing.

And we talk to the Phelps Chamber of Commerce Director about new classes that will be a part of this Saturday's Maple Syrup Fest.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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ONEIDA COUNTY - 65 species of native mammals call Wisconsin home.

The DNR wants help collecting data about all of them.

"Snapshot Wisconsin" is a statewide wildlife monitoring program. It relies on volunteers to host a trail camera throughout the year.

"We ask a volunteer to set the camera out for us and go out and check it periodically, change the camera chip, change the batteries. Then they upload the photos to a central site," said DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz.

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MADISON - Republican Assembly Speaker Robin Vos says he's "generally supportive" a bill allowing the carrying of concealed weapons without a permit.

Vos told reporters Thursday he hasn't yet asked Assembly Republicans where they stand on the bill but that they plan to discuss the proposal.

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MADISON - The University of Wisconsin, K-12 schools and the Department of Natural Resources will all be in the spotlight as the Legislature's budget-writing committee completes three days of briefings.

The Joint Finance Committee meeting on Thursday comes after a 14-hour marathon Wednesday that saw Republicans on the panel disagreeing sharply with key planks of Gov. Scott Walker's budget.

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VILAS COUNTY - Last August, a Vilas County man threatened to shoot or drown himself, leading to a standoff with police.

Wednesday, 49-year-old Mark Mayo pled guilty to intentionally firing a firearm at a law enforcement officer and operating a firearm while intoxicated.

Last August, Mayo called the Vilas County Sheriff's Office saying he had been drinking, taking prescription pills, and had a gun.

According to police, Mayo said if he saw officers, he would shoot them.

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CRANDON - A woman charged with helping sneak prescription pills into the Forest County Jail will need several thousand dollars to get out of jail.

52-year-old Patricia Kirker had her initial appearance in Crandon on Thursday.  Police say she supplied 20 pills for an inmate on work release to sell in the jail.

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CRESCENT - Once Eurasian Water Milfoil invades a lake, it likely won't ever leave a lake.

The invasive species has slowly been making its way into lakes here in the Northwoods.

It first occurred in Squash Lake in Oneida County in 2009. The Lake Association had luck containing the plant by using divers.

"We decided to use divers to pull Eurasian Water Milfoil. Over the years we've worked with divers to do that. It cost roughly $25,000 a year to do that," said Squash Lake Association Board Member Craig Zarley.

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