Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Using e-cigarettes to quit smokingSubmitted: 04/02/2014
Using e-cigarettes to quit smoking
Story By Kaitlyn Howe

RHINELANDER - Quitting smoking can be very difficult.

Some people have turned to patches, pills or just going cold turkey to quit.

But now, more and more are using e-cigarettes as a way to kick the habit.

And it seems that it's becoming more popular in the Northwoods.

E-Cig Central opened in Antigo in January and they opened another location in Rhinelander in March.

The owner thinks this is a good way for people to quit.

"I've seen people already went from two, three packs a day to cutting out the cigarettes. To cutting out the nicotine, to where they don't even have [e-cigarettes] anymore," says Marcus Welnetz, E-Cig Central Co-Owner.

E-Cig Central is considering building more locations.

Owners believe e-cigarettes are better for you than traditional cigarettes.

"For the most part it has been smokers that either want to quit or find a healthier alternative to smoking cigarettes. Cause there's far less ingredients in these, no carcinogens. And as far as we know so far it doesn't have any health problems," says Welnetz.

But some think that using e-cigarettes to quit is dangerous.

The juice used in the e-cigarettes can vary significantly by brand, and that's a concern for some.

"There are simply too many unknowns. The product is very new and it has not been regulated by any federal agency. So there might be chemicals or other products in the vapors that we don't know about. A lot of e-cigarettes are produced in Wisconsin, but some come from China and elsewhere," says Maria Skubal of the Oneida County Health Department.

Workers at health department can't say if the vapors from e-cigarettes are bad for others.

Right now it's up to businesses to decide whether they allow people to use e-cigarettes indoors.

The department wants people to look at other options to quit smoking.

"We really don't recommend using e-cigarettes as a safe means of smoking cessation. Because there's just so many other things that come along with them that we don't know about. We recommend using cessation counseling and FDA approved medications as the most effective means [of] quitting."

The health department also recommends talking to your doctor if you're looking to quit.



Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 08/17/2017

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:


We take our Long Summer Weekend to Vilas County where we show you the progress of a major reconstruction project on Lac du Flambeau's Indian Bowl which is now halfway done.

We meet a cranberry farmer who's been in the business for almost 40 years and talk to him about the history of cranberry growing in the Manitowish Waters area.

And we introduce you to a 76-year-old Eagle River man who competes in Triathlons with people half his age.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more on our Long Summer Weekend from Lincoln County tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

+ Read More

EAGLE RIVER - Doctors thought back surgery and age would hold Jack Godding back.  

Just a few months after being told his limits, he out did them and set higher standards. 

"In general I'm racing against myself," said Goding. 

When you think of competitive athletes, someone like Eagle River's Jack Godding probably isn't the first thing to come to mind. 

That mind set will be your disadvantage if you're ever up against Jack in a race.

"It's a personal goal, personal goal," said Gooding. 

Jack's been competing in races most of his life and started kayaking just six years ago. Not even back surgery could slow him down. 

"First [the doctor] said I wouldn't be able to kayak for almost a year," said Godding.

Just a few months later he was cruising through the waters.

"I'd like to see how many younger ones I can out do ," said Godding. 

+ Read More

Play Video

NORTHWOODS - Next Monday's solar eclipse will look fascinating, but it can damage your eyes for a lifetime.

It's never safe to look directly at the sun's rays, even though there will be a partial eclipse here in the Northwoods.

Regular sunglasses won't protect you, so if you plan to view the solar eclipse you need special solar eclipse sunglasses.

Those glasses are one size fits all, so it's important to check they are snug on your child's head, too.

+ Read More

MILWAUKEE - A Wisconsin senator wants the State Department to investigate reports of tainted alcohol at Mexican resorts.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel recently reported travelers becoming sick after drinking alcohol at resorts south of the border.

That includes a 20 year old Wisconsin woman who died in January after being pulled from a resort pool.

+ Read More

MADISON - A mayor says a plaque honoring Confederate soldiers has been removed from a cemetery in traditionally liberal Madison, Wisconsin, and a second memorial is also coming down.

Madison Mayor Paul Soglin announced the memorials' removal Thursday, saying the Civil War was "a defense of the deplorable practice of slavery."

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - DNR Furbearer Research Scientist Dr. Nathan Roberts calls bobcats "a conservation success story."
Their population numbers are up across the United States.

The DNR doubled the harvest quota this year at 750 bobcats because of that healthy population size.

"While the population's grown, we've also increased our understanding of bobcats considerably. Working together with hunters and trappers across the state we've increased our understanding of bobcats and our ability to monitor bobcats," said Roberts.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - You probably wouldn't consider a dark, smelly alley an ideal place to sit and relax.  Maggie Steffen agrees, which is why she's planning to transform an alley on Brown Street in Rhinelander.

Steffen plans to tackle the project in three phases.  Phase one is lighting the alley, which sits between The Brick restaurant and Bath and Body Creations.  Downtown Rhinelander, Inc. agreed to pay about $2,800 for five LED lights if the city  would pay for the electricity.  

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here