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New gluten-free grocery shows steady business, more diet options Submitted: 03/27/2014
Story By Kalia Baker


SCHOFIELD - Wheat, rye, barley are just some of the things people can't eat when facing a gluten free diet.

Hidden Sources Gluten Free Grocery in Schofield is giving people in Central Wisconsin more gluten-free options.

Everything in the store--from pasta to M&Ms--is gluten free.

The owner got the idea after being diagnosed with celiac disease. That meant no more gluten in her diet and major health problems.

"Inflammation, swelling, bloating, tummy troubles. A lot of gastro troubles, "said Tracie Rajek, "But the gluten itself can attack your intestines and then they don't work. It can erode the intestine lining and then if they don't work you're not absorbing any nutrients."

Hidden Sources opened its doors about a month ago. Since then, business has been steady.

"The community seems to have embraced this. We do offer a lot of foods that you might see in your local grocery store, but what we expand on is the variety, "said Rajek. "A local grocery store can only have twelve feet of gluten-free items; where we have eight to nine hundred square feet of gluten-free items."

Hidden Sources gets new shipments in every week.

Choosing a gluten-free diet means paying attention to the labels and other words for gluten.

If you have any concerns, you can also get tested for celiac disease.






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