Loading

72°F

64°F

72°F

68°F

71°F

71°F

72°F

71°F

71°F

66°F

71°F

72°F
Search
NEWS STORIES

Former Oneida County corrections officer claims sex discrimination within Sheriff's OfficeSubmitted: 03/17/2014

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - A former Oneida County jail employee believes she was discriminated against and passed over for a promotion because she is a woman.

Tracy Congleton and her lawyer believe sex discrimination was commonly tolerated within the Oneida County Sheriff's Office.

Congleton had been a corrections officer in Oneida County until last November.

Her discrimination complaint against the county claims another jail worker, Keith Fabianski, humiliated her.

In one instance, she says he told her, "If I wanted you to talk I will tell you to talk".

"There was a fair amount of sex discrimination on a day-to-day basis that was tolerated in the Sheriff's Department," Congleton's attorney, Jeff Scott Olson, told us.

We talked to Fabianski on Monday.

He had no response to the claims against him.

Congleton also believes she was passed over for a promotion to Assistant Jail Administrator because of her sex.

She says that after she was the only qualified person to apply, the job description was changed so that Fabianski could be hired.

"I think Ms. Congleton was treated poorly as a woman. I think the procedures employed were irregular and clearly designed to implement a campaign of favoritism," Olson said.

Congleton's lawyer also said he expects to find more evidence of sex discrimination by Oneida County.

Sheriff Grady Hartman told us Monday he looks forward to vigorously defending himself and the Sheriff's Office in this case.

Green Bay lawyer John Haase will defend Oneida County in the case.

Congleton's lawyer said he expects the state to take several months to determine if there is probable cause to move forward with the complaint.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

MINOCQUA - The Northwoods Wildlife Center will see a lot of orphaned wildlife this spring, and the center could use your help preparing for the babies.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - The Northwoods can be a good place for an artist to settle and develop his or her craft.

A fourth-generation craftsman from Eagle River now creates beautiful pieces of furniture on land that his grandfather bought.

Carl Gromoll of Gromoll Woodworks planned to go into medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, but the Vietnam War protests at UW changed his thinking.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Tree research in Rhinelander may help improve ground pollution around the world. Scientists at the U.S. Forest Service Northern Research Station want to use trees to clean the soil using a process called phytoremediation.

+ Read More

Play Video

MADISON - A new report says Gov. Scott Walker's budget plan to eliminate about 30 Department of Natural Resources scientists and educators could cost the agency dozens more positions.

+ Read More

MADISON - A new analysis by the nonpartisan Legislative Fiscal Bureau says a Republican-approved expansion of the private-school voucher program could cost up to $800 million over the next decade.

+ Read More

MADISON - Wisconsin may be the first state in the country to certify teachers who don't have bachelor's degrees under a provision put in the state budget last week.

+ Read More

MADISON - Researchers hope to improve panfish populations by limiting the harvest.

Now, the project has a green light on close to 100 lakes.

The state natural resources board approved going ahead with changes in bag limits yesterday.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here