Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Proposed committee could politicize education standards writing process, replace Common Core Submitted: 02/19/2014
Story By Adam Fox


MADISON - Some Wisconsin legislators believe education standards should get a fresh look and make changes every six years.

Authors of a state education proposal want to form a committee to do that.

The Republican backed bill would give the governor, the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) and the heads of both parties in the legislature the power to pick the 15 member committee.

Republican Rep. Jeremy Thiesfeldt sits on the Assembly Committee on Education and sponsors the bill, AB 617.

He says the selected members would need to be teachers, parents, board members and other education experts. He says the governor would pick six members, DPI would select 5 members, then the majority and minority leaders of the Assembly and Senate would each select a member to round out the 15 person committee.

Thiesfeldt says the committee isn't being proposed as a Republican power grab in education.

"This isn't built just to fit just this time in space," Thiesfeldt said. "This is built looking out to the future too, you know because we're not going to have Republicans in control forever."

But the bill will give the sitting governor's party the power to appoint the majority of the members on the committee. The six selections from the governor's office, plus the two selections from the legislature would make a majority on the 15 member committee.

That's something that worries Democratic Rep. Mandy Wright. She also sits on the Assembly Committee on Education, and worries the proposal is politicizing the standards writing process.

"It's a big reason I ran for office is to make sure that we don't really politicize education, and that we leave it in the hands of the experts," Wright said. "And I am concerned this goes too far in making our standards politicized."

The committee's standards would also replace the state's current Common Core standards. Wisconsin adopted those standards in 2010 for both math and English. More than 45 states have adopted some part of the standards across the country.

According to the Wisconsin Department of Instruction, Common Core provides guidance and support, while still maintaining the local control so important to districts throughout the state. It also helped standardize curriculum.

Wright was a teacher before being elected to the Assembly in 2012. She has experience teaching the Common Core standards.

"I don't think it's perfect," Wright said. "I do think there is room for improvement overall and I see that there was a need for standardization of our curriculum and I think Common Core takes us in the right direction."

State Superintendent Tony Evers agrees. He called the proposed bill "wholly unacceptable" this week.

He said Wednesday in a YouTube post that the standards change would be a step backwards for Wisconsin.

"We're going to be a national embarrassment, for what we are doing in public education, we can't afford that, our economy can't afford that," Evers said.

But Thiesfeldt believes a move away from Common Core and the formation of the committee would be the right move for Wisconsin.

"It's a much more open process than we've had in the past and certainly much more open process that we used to implement common core standards," Thiesfeldt said.

The Assembly Committee on Education will vote on the proposal Thursday.







Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

RHINELANDER - Dozens of Rhinelander students called in sick, forcing the district to shut down early last month. But
teachers weren't immune either. It got so bad that there weren't enough substitute teachers on hand to
fill in for the sick staff. The district is now recruiting more subs to be better prepared for another
outbreak.

+ Read More

MERRILL - President Donald Trump took the oath of office in Washington D.C. But a café in Merrill wanted to bring some of that memorable day here to the Northwoods.

The Checkered Churn is known for its creative sandwiches and menu items.The "Eat Brave" menu featured a few inauguration-inspired foods on Friday.

+ Read More

MADISON - A judge has ordered a suspended University of Wisconsin-Madison student to stand trial on charges that he sexually assaulted and harassed multiple women.

Alec Cook, of Edina, Minnesota, faces 21 charges involving 10 women. The counts include sexual assault, stalking, and strangulation. Sixteen counts are felonies; the rest are misdemeanors.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - A lot of people turn to antibiotics to get better when they get sick, but a Veterans Affairs clinic nurse wants elderly patients to avoid getting sick completely.

+ Read More

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Donald Trump is now the 45th president of the United States. He's just taken the oath of office on the West Front of the Capitol.

The combative billionaire businessman and television celebrity won election in November over Democrat Hillary Clinton, and today he's leading a profoundly divided country - one that's split between Americans enthralled and horrified by his victory.

+ Read More

Play Video

WAUSAU - The Wausau Police Department welcomed three new officers to the force Friday. 

City Hall was full of city workers, police officers, firefighters, friends and family for the swearing-in ceremony. The officers are all excited to start serving the community and, in some cases, fulfill a lifelong dream.

+ Read More

MADISON - A suspect is charged with killing a western Wisconsin sheriff's deputy in October and endangering the safety of several other officers as they were arresting him.

According to the criminal complaint filed Friday, Doug Nitek fatally shot Rusk County Sheriff's Deputy Dan Glaze on Oct. 29 after Glaze approached Nitek's vehicle. Glaze died of a gunshot wound to the head.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here