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Reporting deer deaths to the DNRSubmitted: 01/31/2014
Story By Matt Brooks

Reporting deer deaths to the DNR
WOODRUFF - You should report dead deer that you find on your property.

That helps the DNR get a better understanding of winter's impact on deer.

This also helps them track the spread of chronic wasting disease
among herds.

People that find dead deer can report it to the local DNR station or wildlife
biologist.

"We certainly will expect to see some deer dying this year because of the
extreme weather," said Wildlife Biologist Michele Woodford. "We'll certainly
look to see if they're diseased from something else, but we'll probably expect
to see some of it caused by starvation as well."

It's too early to get a full impact of deer deaths, deer experts say most tend
to die in early Spring.

Anterless deer tags could be more limited next hunting season.

"Deer tend to congregate in conifer areas or places where there's thermal
cover," said Woodford. "So they're going to be in the pines or places where
it's warm and out of the wind. What we might see is die-offs in those areas and
those we would certainly like to be reported to the DNR, myself, and the other
local biologists just so we can go out and assess those deer."

There have been few reports of dead deer in Northern Wisconsin so far this year.



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