Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

USDA meets to address Wisconsin Tribal needs Submitted: 10/30/2013

Adam Fox
10 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
afox@wjfw.com


MOLE LAKE - Some members of Wisconsin's Tribes rely on their land for survival. They farm, fish and gather to put food on the table. But it can be difficult for tribes to find funding for large food projects.

That's why the US Department of Agriculture met with Wisconsin tribes Wednesday. Both sides hope to use it to plan programs and address tribal needs.

Oneida Nation of Wisconsin Vice Chair Greg Matson says tribes have some catch up to do with the USDA.

Matson says the USDA programs help them improve their agricultural infrastructure. Funding can be the biggest challenge.

Leslie Wheelock,USDA Office of Tribal Relations Director, says access to funding is the biggest issues for tribes.

"It will always be access to capital," Wheelock said. "Unlike states and counties, tribes don't tax their people they have a tendency to not tax their businesses because the states come in and tax the businesses and if you tax a business too much the business won't come."

The USDA formed a special advisory board in 2011 to ensure Native Americans participate in and benefit their programs.

"It's to get our tribal people up to speed to the point where they know who to go to in the USDA," Wheelock said. "The USDA has to be builder in that relationship because we know what we have to offer."

Some Wisconsin tribal farmers have benefited from programs like USDA start up loans, but some farming isn't considered a practice by the agency.

For example, the tribal wild rice harvest isn't recognized as conventional farming practice. Some Tribe members are working to change that.









Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

RHINELANDER - Not riding the bus to school, as a kid, usually meant you overslept.

But on Wednesday morning, some students got up a little early just to miss the bus.

+ Read More

WAUSAU - Three men who have been confined for sex crimes will return to the Wausau area in the near future, according to Wausau police.

+ Read More

Play Video

ASHLAND - U.S. Rep. Sean Duffy (R-Weston) won his congressional seat in 2010, and hasn't had a particularly tight race in any of his runs for re-elections.

His victories over Democrats Julie Lassa, Pat Krietlow, and Kelly Westlund were all fairly comfortable.

But three northcentral Wisconsin Democrats hope to end that streak.

+ Read More

Play Video

ONEIDA COUNTY - Parents don't always stay together or get married when they have a baby. But currently, there aren't many co-parenting educational options available in Oneida County.

That's why the UW-Extension Oneida County office is beginning to offer a class called Parents Forever.

+ Read More

Play Video

EAGLE RIVER - After four decades in the business, you might think Leo and Mary Kay Horant would be leaning toward retirement. But Leo would tell you his greenhouse is his vacation spot.

"This is my happy place," Horant said Tuesday morning.  "I'll work 12 hours a day."

Never was that more apparent than eight months ago.  Fire ripped through the Eagle River couple's home and garden center on Highway 70 August 17, 2015.  The Horants' "Gardener's Gate" greenhouse near Pick 'n Save became something of a lifeboat.

+ Read More

WAUSAU - Authorities have released the name of a Wausau police officer who fatally shot a suspect in a domestic disturbance last weekend.

The Wausau Police Department identifies the officer who shot the suspect as James Martin. Martin became a police officer in January 2015 after working as a Wausau community service officer.

+ Read More

WISCONSIN - Children's Hospital of Wisconsin says lab tests show that a child diagnosed with Elizabethkingia is not connected to the strain that has caused an outbreak of the bloodstream infection in Wisconsin.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here