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Changes coming for deer hunting rulesSubmitted: 10/23/2013
Story By Adam Fox


RHINELANDER - The Wisconsin DNR held one of its 35 public meetings to discuss changes to the state's deer hunting rules in Rhinlander Wednesday.

The Wisconsin DNR wants to make deer hunting rules simpler. They also want to keep the deer population strong in the state. That's why the department had an independent review of the state's deer management by Dr. James Kroll in 2011.

The report offered 62 recommendations. One proposal would expand the Dec. 24- Jan. 4 Holiday hunt in the three geographic southern zones of Wisconsin. The hunting would be allowed in those zones including all areas south of HWY 64.

But some snowmobile riders worry owners wont open their trials because they want to keep it quite for hunting.

DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz doesn't think the layered seasons won't conflict.

"In this case, we're not anticipating that," Holtz said. "Everything I have seen looks like its going to keep it in that southern part of the state where typically snow doesn't fall or doesn't make quality trails for much of that time."

The plan also proposes a Deer Management Assistance program. For a small fee, DNR biologists and foresters would evaluate your land and create a localized deer management plan.

"I think this is a great opportunity to get folks more invested in land management on their own properties and try to provide some resources that are already available through the department," Holtz said.

There are more possible changes from the report including deer management unit reduction and the formation of county base deer management committees.

The proposal is in public comment period until Nov. 8. The final rule package will be presented to the Natural Resources Board on Dec. 10-11.




Related Weblinks:
DTR Rule Package Survey
DNR Deer Trustee Report

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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 03/30/2017

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

Every year, the federal government puts almost a half-billion dollars into public radio and television. But in his preliminary budget proposal earlier this month, President Trump pushed for cutting all of that funding. Tonight we talk to managers of public radio stations in Wausau and Rhinelander about how those cuts would affect their stations.

We'll tell you about a plan that would turn a former Rhinelander nursing home building into student housing.

And we talk to the Phelps Chamber of Commerce Director about new classes that will be a part of this Saturday's Maple Syrup Fest.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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ONEIDA COUNTY - 65 species of native mammals call Wisconsin home.

The DNR wants help collecting data about all of them.

"Snapshot Wisconsin" is a statewide wildlife monitoring program. It relies on volunteers to host a trail camera throughout the year.

"We ask a volunteer to set the camera out for us and go out and check it periodically, change the camera chip, change the batteries. Then they upload the photos to a central site," said DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz.

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MADISON - Republican Assembly Speaker Robin Vos says he's "generally supportive" a bill allowing the carrying of concealed weapons without a permit.

Vos told reporters Thursday he hasn't yet asked Assembly Republicans where they stand on the bill but that they plan to discuss the proposal.

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MADISON - The University of Wisconsin, K-12 schools and the Department of Natural Resources will all be in the spotlight as the Legislature's budget-writing committee completes three days of briefings.

The Joint Finance Committee meeting on Thursday comes after a 14-hour marathon Wednesday that saw Republicans on the panel disagreeing sharply with key planks of Gov. Scott Walker's budget.

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RHINELANDER - You can watch fake doctors perform fake surgeries on TV almost any night of the week.  It's not every day you get to watch an actually surgery performed.

Students from the Northwoods learned their experience Wednesday was not for the faint of heart.

High school and college students filled the Nicolet College Theater in Rhinelander to watch a live stream of an open heart surgery.  Doctors, nurses, and other surgical staff from a hospital in Illinois were on camera and answered questions as they put in a left ventricular assistive device in a 37-year-old man's heart.

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MINOCQUA - Minocqua's Northwoods Zip line Adventure Tours added new attractions for the upcoming season in hopes of bringing more people to the Northwoods.

The Northwoods Zip Line Adventure Tours has been a travel destination for thrill seekers around the country.

Owner Josh Russart wanted to bring an extreme outdoor activity to the Northwoods.

"We have something for everyone," said Russart.

But Russart wasn't content with just zip lining. He added more attractions every year since he opened the canopy tours in 2014. Last summer he added an aerial adventure tour.

General manager Andrew Warner says it's a mix of an obstacle course and zip lining.

"Our aerial adventure is going to offer a little bit more of a challenge for people that maybe are a little bit more of a thrill seeker," said Warner.

But Warner says not to worry if you prefer to keep your feet on the ground

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CRESCENT - Once Eurasian Water Milfoil invades a lake, it likely won't ever leave a lake.

The invasive species has slowly been making its way into lakes here in the Northwoods.

It first occurred in Squash Lake in Oneida County in 2009. The Lake Association had luck containing the plant by using divers.

"We decided to use divers to pull Eurasian Water Milfoil. Over the years we've worked with divers to do that. It cost roughly $25,000 a year to do that," said Squash Lake Association Board Member Craig Zarley.

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