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NEWS STORIES

Changes coming for deer hunting rulesSubmitted: 10/23/2013

Adam Fox
10 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
afox@wjfw.com


RHINELANDER - The Wisconsin DNR held one of its 35 public meetings to discuss changes to the state's deer hunting rules in Rhinlander Wednesday.

The Wisconsin DNR wants to make deer hunting rules simpler. They also want to keep the deer population strong in the state. That's why the department had an independent review of the state's deer management by Dr. James Kroll in 2011.

The report offered 62 recommendations. One proposal would expand the Dec. 24- Jan. 4 Holiday hunt in the three geographic southern zones of Wisconsin. The hunting would be allowed in those zones including all areas south of HWY 64.

But some snowmobile riders worry owners wont open their trials because they want to keep it quite for hunting.

DNR Wildlife Biologist Jeremy Holtz doesn't think the layered seasons won't conflict.

"In this case, we're not anticipating that," Holtz said. "Everything I have seen looks like its going to keep it in that southern part of the state where typically snow doesn't fall or doesn't make quality trails for much of that time."

The plan also proposes a Deer Management Assistance program. For a small fee, DNR biologists and foresters would evaluate your land and create a localized deer management plan.

"I think this is a great opportunity to get folks more invested in land management on their own properties and try to provide some resources that are already available through the department," Holtz said.

There are more possible changes from the report including deer management unit reduction and the formation of county base deer management committees.

The proposal is in public comment period until Nov. 8. The final rule package will be presented to the Natural Resources Board on Dec. 10-11.




Related Weblinks:
DTR Rule Package Survey
DNR Deer Trustee Report

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