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A Day for Nicolet event fundraises for college scholarshipsSubmitted: 10/23/2013
Story By Melissa Constanzer


RHINELANDER - A college education costs a lot of money. Scholarships are a BIG HELP in making it possible for students to attend college.

The Nicolet College Foundation held its largest fundraiser of the year today, A Day for Nicolet.

"Today is a very important day. It's more than just dollars for scholarships though. It's also about strengthening relationships with the so many donars who support the Nicolet College Foundation and ultimately Nicolet College students," says Heather Schallock, Executive Director of Nicolet College Foundation.

Volunteers are made up of alumni, students, and community members. Many Nicolet students depend on scholarships.

"Without the boost of the scholarships my first semester, I probably would have never enrolled at all. That scholarship enabled me to enroll, and indeed, finish my program," says Tony Bellman, student and Nicolet College Student Ambassador.

The Nicolet College Foundation has hundreds of donors. Scholarships are issued to about a hundred students. They help students pay for books and tuition.

"The returning adult, when they're trying to juggle family, and school, and work all at the same time, because your school time takes away from your work time, those scholarships are definitely needed to fill the gap or bridge the gap for the income level," said Bellman.

People are still able to donate after today. You can find out how to donate by contacting the Nicolet College Foundation at (715)-365-4518 or check out the scholarship page on their website.

Related Weblinks:
Nicolet College Foundation Scholarships

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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 07/28/2016

- Tonight on Newswatch 12:

We look into the history of the Eagle River man who was shot and killed by officers outside of Merrill Tuesday morning after he was pulled over in Antigo, shot at a police officer and lead police into a chase that took them to Lincoln County.

We'll introduce you to the founder of the Raptor Education Group in Antigo which helps nurse injured birds back to life and returns them to the wild.

And today was "Miracle Treat Day" at Dairy Queen as the restaurant raises money for the Children's Miracle Network.

We'll bring you the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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ANTIGO - When you can't catch fish, it's easy to blame the lure. If you need something different, people in Antigo make a lure that you might want to try. The Mepps assembly plant is located right off Highway 45.

Mepps fishing lures were originally made in Paris, France, starting in 1938. Back in the 1970's, a local Antigo sporting goods store owner, Todd Sheldon, decided to buy that facility and moved it to Nice, France. His son, Mike is now the president of the company.

"The guys that own the Mepps company in France were getting old enough to where they wanted to retire so we bought the Mepps company in France in 1972," said Sheldon.

One detail that makes the lure number one in the world is that they use actual animal tail fur.

"The tails are washed, dyed and tied back there," said plant worker Kim Wiegert. "And they're dehydrated. They will store a long time, so they can last 3 to 5 years."

There are many benefits to using real hair as opposed to artificial hair.

"The hair is hollow and goes through a lot of wear and tear," said Wiegert. "Other hairs would disintegrate, and fall apart. With these, it'll last longer, the fish can bite on them and it'll take a long time before they'll actually chew them apart."

Along with the hairs, there is a secret way to put the lures together that makes Mepps the best.

"We have a certain wind that we have and we can tell when we put them together, how it should be. All of our spinners are field tested before they actually go out," said Wiegert.

Even though the company distributes their product around the world, the Sheldon's still enjoy being based in Antigo.

"It's home. I grew up here and my parents grew up here and of course my kids did. And it's such a different pace of life here than the rest of the world," said Sheldon.

Everyone putting the little pieces together are women. Kim is just one who works in the plant that has been there for nearly 40 years. She also gives tours of the facility to the public.

"I like to react with the people when they come in, especially ones that have fishing stories to tell you. It's interesting here and you get to meet other people," said Wiegert.

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ALLOUEZ - A state senator says some radios didn't work at Green Bay's maximum security prison the day a corrections officer was attacked.

State Sen. Dave Hansen, D-Green Bay, is requesting an independent review of problems at the Green Bay Correctional Institution in Allouez.

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MADISON - Wisconsin's top health officials says the state's long-term care programs for the elderly and disabled will be available statewide by early 2018.

The programs Family Care and IRIS, which stands for Include, Respect I Self-Direct, are designed to keep 55,000 elderly and disabled people out of nursing homes by offering care in their own homes. Wisconsin Department of Health Services Interim Secretary Tom Engels announced Thursday the programs would expand to the final seven of Wisconsin's 72 counties.

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RHINELANDER - At 51 years old, Rhinelander's Chris Moore had felt off for months. In May, it got worse. His wife, Sherri, knew something was wrong.

"'Oh, no. We're going to call an ambulance,'" Chris remembered her saying.

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FLORENCE COUNTY - Driving through the Northwoods, you can see plenty of deer, cows, and horses…but bison? Those are a little rarer--unless you travel to a ranch in Florence County, where the Rock family thinks they've tapped into a special and healthy food source.

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STEVENS POINT - Watching her grandsons, Ben and Marty, learn to play in harmony with a large group of strangers, Jeanne Wieland knew the outdoor concert was a proud moment.

"Nice to see them develop the confidence in their abilities," Wieland said.

Wieland drove up to Stevens Point from northwestern Illinois to join her family at the UW-Stevens Point's "American Suzuki Institute."

The week-long camp brings together more than 1,000 students and families to learn the Suzuki method.

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