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NEWS STORIES

Merrill haunted sawmill gets good scares Submitted: 10/19/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


MERRILL - You can expect plenty of screams at haunted houses this time of the year.

For organizers, that takes a lot of work.

Fear keeps the Merrill Boy Scout Troup 599 running.

"We were looking for a fundraiser to help out the boy scouts for the cost of scouting. So we set up a committee and we started throwing around some ideas of different ideas for a haunted house," said Haunted Sawmill Committee chairman, Jerry Hersil.

"Everybody's done haunted houses, so we wanted to tie something in to the Merrill area that fit with the logging theme. That's where we came up with the haunted sawmill."

This is third year they've scared people.

But this year they had to buy the sawmill because the city wanted to tear it down.

They keep the outside looking nice.

But the inside is a whole different story.

"Inside we're always adding new rooms to the building making new areas for people to wonder through and new exciting places for them to look at." Hersil said.

A new room that they recently added that might get you turned around is probably something you've seen on TV.

"It's just something you don't normally see. You have a group go through and they think ok this is easy," said Troop 599 Eagle Scout, Bret Waller.

"They find a door and go through it. They just end up in the same spot. You have a lot of opportunities to scare people through there. It's just a fun room to be in."

"You get the big guys that think oh I'm too tough for this. They come around the corner and the first guy might not scare them," Waller said.

"But the next guy that's not expecting somebody to be there, you jump out at them. They hit the wall and there are people holding on to them are scared. The big guy is oh I'm scared too. That's probably the best part. Getting the people to think this isn't scary and scaring them into a corner."

This first timer has high expectations.

"For my father to push me into something and me peeing my pants." said Emily Edwards-Sonnenberg.

You can expect that here.

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