Loading

76°F

75°F

77°F

74°F

75°F

77°F

80°F

74°F

74°F

80°F

77°F

78°F
Search
NEWS STORIES

Merrill haunted sawmill gets good scares Submitted: 10/19/2013
Story By Shardaa Gray


MERRILL - You can expect plenty of screams at haunted houses this time of the year.

For organizers, that takes a lot of work.

Fear keeps the Merrill Boy Scout Troup 599 running.

"We were looking for a fundraiser to help out the boy scouts for the cost of scouting. So we set up a committee and we started throwing around some ideas of different ideas for a haunted house," said Haunted Sawmill Committee chairman, Jerry Hersil.

"Everybody's done haunted houses, so we wanted to tie something in to the Merrill area that fit with the logging theme. That's where we came up with the haunted sawmill."

This is third year they've scared people.

But this year they had to buy the sawmill because the city wanted to tear it down.

They keep the outside looking nice.

But the inside is a whole different story.

"Inside we're always adding new rooms to the building making new areas for people to wonder through and new exciting places for them to look at." Hersil said.

A new room that they recently added that might get you turned around is probably something you've seen on TV.

"It's just something you don't normally see. You have a group go through and they think ok this is easy," said Troop 599 Eagle Scout, Bret Waller.

"They find a door and go through it. They just end up in the same spot. You have a lot of opportunities to scare people through there. It's just a fun room to be in."

"You get the big guys that think oh I'm too tough for this. They come around the corner and the first guy might not scare them," Waller said.

"But the next guy that's not expecting somebody to be there, you jump out at them. They hit the wall and there are people holding on to them are scared. The big guy is oh I'm scared too. That's probably the best part. Getting the people to think this isn't scary and scaring them into a corner."

This first timer has high expectations.

"For my father to push me into something and me peeing my pants." said Emily Edwards-Sonnenberg.

You can expect that here.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

ONEIDA COUNTY - Invasive species specialists work hard to protect our lakes, but a few areas in Oneida County aren't doing as well as they'd like.

Aquatic experts have found invasive species in four new Oneida County lakes this summer. It's not a great sign, but it also isn't like years ago when someone might find acres of an invasive. However, it's still an issue.

+ Read More

MADISON - New federal filings show a super PAC supporting Gov. Scott Walker's bid for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination has raised a little more than $20 million over the first 11 weeks or so of its existence

+ Read More

Play Video

MADISON - People with five, seven, or even ten or more OWI convictions in Wisconsin usually serve time in jail or even in prison.  But they could be driving again soon after they get out.

Wisconsin law allows a person convicted of an OWI to get an occupational license for traveling to places such as work or church within 45 days after their release. But some lawmakers think that policy could lead to serious trouble.

+ Read More

ST. GERMAIN - St. Germain's Rib Fest will look a little different next year. This will be the last year of "Pig in the Pines" as we know it.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - A 16-year-old male crashed into an electric pole just east of Rhinelander this morning.

+ Read More

Play Video

BOULDER JUNCTION - The boat looks like something from a science fiction movie as it creeps across Northwoods lakes at night.

Its long arms jut into the water, sending electrical pulses into the lake.

Under a nearly-full moon on a warm July night, it motors across Sparkling Lake in Vilas County.

"We can actually sneak up on them in the evenings, when it's dark out," says Dr. Noah Lottig, who's driving the boat. "They're up there, they don't see us coming, and we can sneak up on them."

+ Read More

Play Video

WAUSAU - Some veterans worry the community will forget war memories as time goes on.

The Montgomery, Plant, Dudley American Legion Post 10 in Wausau wants to remember one group of U.S. allies in the Vietnam War.

That's the Hmong community in Wausau.

"They hunted the Hmong like animals," said Xeng Xiong, a Hmong veteran living in Wausau.

That's how he described living in Laos once his country fell to communism in 1975.

"So they tried everything to kill Hmong men, Hmong soldiers," Xiong said.

Xiong is one of the many Hmong who escaped to the US after the Vietnam War. As a Hmong, he was targeted by the communist government for his involvement with the US.

"They hated the Hmong people because they labeled Hmong men as the number one enemy who supported United States," Xiong said. 

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here