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Staying fit a key for hunting successSubmitted: 10/03/2013

Ben Meyer
Executive Producer
bmeyer@wjfw.com


WOODRUFF - We call hunters and fishermen "sportsmen".

We also might think what they do isn't as physically difficult as other "sportsmen", like runners, swimmers, or football players.

But some people think that's no excuse for hunters to be out of shape.

Dean Bortz is an avid hunter from Arbor Vitae.

He began a more committed training routine while he was recovering from an arm injury in 2011.

He learned just how important fitness is for hunting success.

"I was overlooking it. I thought I was in decent shape. I was always able to get out there and do stuff. But now, I can see where I can do things better - you still get winded, you still get sweaty - but I can get up and down a hill now," says hunter Dean Bortz.

Bortz hopes more hunters will commit to being in good shape.

Working with a fitness instructor can help.

"I have a wonderful job here to help people meet their goal to do what they want to do in life. I think that's a wonderful thing, what you want to do in life," says Marshfield Clinic Woodruff Center Fitness Instructor Laura Stoffel.

One physician understands a reason why getting into shape is such a challenge.

"I think a lot of people are afraid to move. It's called kinesiophobia. It's just simply a fear of movement because they're afraid if they come in with pain, and they move, they're going to hurt more," says Marshfield Clinic Physical Medicine Physician Dr. Jim Mullen.

But most times, the opposite is true.

Especially for hunters, staying in motion before the season helps prevent injuries.

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Headings started the Headings Family Farm in August. He says he is looking to make the birds even happier this week.

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