Loading

31°F

32°F

34°F

32°F

31°F

30°F

34°F

33°F

31°F

35°F

33°F

34°F
NEWS STORIES

Horse soccer? It's real.Submitted: 10/03/2013

Lauren Stephenson
5 p.m. Anchor/Reporter
lstephenson@wjfw.com


MERRILL - A local stable finds a unique way to train their horses.

In fact, it's so unique the Today Show featured the group in it's segment, "Fact or Fiction."

"It's a blast. You've got a big horse kicking a big ole' ball around and it looks silly. It's a lot of fun. Anybody can get into it," says Equine Soccer player Marty Bever.

He plays at the Keystone Stables in Merrill.

That's where America's Equine Soccer League got its start.

"Equine soccer is a training tool that we slowly started playing real soccer games with. There are other people in the country that do this. We use it as a way to get on your horses in the winter instead of parking them outside in the winter, waiting for the snow to thaw," explains league creator Terry Fenwick.

It also gives people the chance to improve their skills and relationships with their horses.

Other riders around the country play the sport thanks to Terry Fenwick and his wife, Jolene.

They started the league in 1997.

Now people from all riding backgrounds and ages play.

"Right now we play 3 on 3. We're in a 60 by 120 arena...So we have 2 forwards, we have a goalie. It's a lot like your regular soccer game," says Fenwick.

But equine soccer is more than just a game.

It helped Marty Bever transition back to civilian life after serving in Iraq.

He's been back for three years.

"It was just able to calm me down a little bit. And that was kind of a nice transition back into the civilian life," Bever explains.

The Today Show featured the league on its Wednesday show.

Members of America's Equine Soccer League hope the national attention will inspire others to join.

"The fact that they found us and wanted to do something about us is really humbling. We hope that it takes off and helps us go. We hope that we can use this to better the game and better the league, and get more people interested in this," explains Fenwick.

"I've met some really great friends and I can't wait for every season to start," adds Bever.

They hope you'll feel the same way.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

MILWAUKEE - The City of Milwaukee is proposing paying $6.5 million to a man wrongly convicted of a 1995 murder.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Ministry St. Mary's Hospital in Rhinelander will see some changes this year. Renovations to the hospital started March 16.

+ Read More

Play Video

MINOCQUA - The Badgers don't face Kentucky in the Final Four until Saturday, but Northwoods fans are already stocking up on their gear.

Employees at Packerland Plus in Minocqua have already seen plenty of fans come in to buy gear. They usually see their Badgers' sales increase between the Elite Eight and Final Four.

+ Read More

Play Video

RHINELANDER - Some landowners don't want to make changes to their land because they worry those changes will hurt wildlife. But biologists say the opposite is true.

The Wisconsin Young Forest Partnership's goal is to help landowners improve young forest habitat on their properties.

+ Read More

Play Video

WISCONSIN - Gogebic Taconite won't seek an iron ore mine in northern Wisconsin, but the company's announcement last month isn't enough for the Sierra Club.

The environmental group wants a repeal of the state law that relaxed the mine permitting process.

+ Read More

Play Video

MERRILL - Police used to teach people at schools and public places to stay put and hide if they faced an active shooter situation.

But the Merrill Police Department is helping to change that thinking.

Analysis of mass shootings shows people who run or fight back often have a better chance of survival.

For example, during the Virginia Tech shootings in 2007, 28 of the 30 people who were killed reacted passively, not proactively.

+ Read More

Play Video

MINOCQUA - In Wisconsin, the Great Lakes play an important role in our lives. A program in the Northwoods Wednesday night will take a closer look behind the science of those lakes.

This month's Science on Tap topic is "The Great Lakes, Great Challenges, Great Science." Dr. Jim Hurley from the UW-Madison Aquatic Sciences Center will be the featured speaker.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 




Click Here