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Local college makes big fundraising pushSubmitted: 09/26/2013
Story By Lauren Stephenson


ANTIGO - Many people struggle to keep up with the rising cost of college.

One local technical college is trying to help.

Thursday is "A Day for NTC Students" at the Northcentral Technical College in Antigo.

Employees team up and call on area businesses to donate to the NTC Foundation.

The money goes to scholarships for NTC students.

"The program started because we have a need. Over 80 percent of our students are financially aidable and need assistance. Now this short term program that we're talking about today, those are for students who don't even have an eligibility for financial aid but still have a significant financial need," explains NTC Foundation Executive Director Jeannie Worden.

Langlade Hospital started a matching campaign a few years ago.

This year, it will match donations up to $5,000.

The hospital believes helping NTC students pay for their schooling ends up benefiting the hospital and its patients.

"25 percent of our nurses came from NTC. In the last year, about 70 percent of our medical assistants came out of the NTC program, and about 50 percent of the nurses we hired the last year. So you can see these are local people who are well-trained and it's an investment. This endowment is an investment in our community," says Langlade Hospital Executive Director David Schneider.

Medical students aren't the only NTC students that stay in the Antigo area once they grauduate.

72 percent of NTC students end up working for local businesses.

That means businesses that donate likely see a return investment.

The NTC Foundation hopes to raise $12,000 Thursday.

The program's raised more than $160,000 over the last 14 years.

The Wausau campus has its own fundraising day.

You can call (715) 803-1302 to donate, or visit the website linked below.

Related Weblinks:
NTC Foundation website

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