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NEWS STORIES

Dog quilled by porcupine, then abandonedSubmitted: 08/26/2013
Story By Lex Gray


RHINELANDER - Most pet owners probably can't imagine abandoning an animal. But what if giving up your pet seems to be the only option?

Removing all of the quills on this lab mix cost about $200. That's probably why her owner left her at the front door of the Oneida County Humane Society.

A volunteer found her there about two weeks ago, with quills stuck on her face, paws, and down her throat.

"We took her directly to the vet, and she had immediate surgery to remove them," said director Bria Swartout. "We were told by a couple of the vet centers that they did receive a call about 45 minutes after she showed up at our door of a family inquiring how much it would cost to remove porcupine quills, and they stated they could not afford that."

This dog did get the care she needed, and donations covered some of it.

But abandoning your pet and relying on the humane society aren't the only options.

"We understand that it's hard when you have unexpected vet bills, but always ask your vet if there's other payment options, if they're willing to work with you," Swartout said. "There's Care Credit out there, it's an opportunity to get a credit card for vet bills and other medical issues. There's different opportunities out there, asking family, friends to help you with these things. It's always unfortunate when a family has to lose a pet because they can't afford to do any cares on them."

The lab mix is up for adoption. Swartout guesses she's about a year old, but that's all she knows about her, since she was abandoned.

If you're interested in adopting her, call the Oneida County Humane Society at 715-362-5992.

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 IN OTHER NEWS
What We're Working OnSubmitted: 07/28/2015

- After years of rumbling over potholes, drivers in Rhinelander will soon be able to travel smoothly over Lincoln Street. The city will completely resurface the busiest part of the road starting Monday. We'll have what drivers need to know.

- Veterinarians in the Northwoods have been treating more cases of heartworm in dogs lately. The illness can leave a foot-long parasite in your dog's body. We take a look at treatment and prevention.

- The Northwoods attracts campers from all across the state every summer. But tonight at 5, we'll introduce you to some Boy Scouts who ventured more than 3,000 miles to visit Langlade County.

- Learn more about spiny water flea, one of the newer invasive species in Northwoods lakes.

- And we'll look at the Wabeno Art and Music Fest, a first-year event coming up this weekend.

We'll have the details on these stories and more tonight on Newswatch 12 - news from where you live.

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MADISON - Gov. Scott Walker says the bill passed by the Wisconsin State Assembly committing $250 million in taxpayer money toward paying for a new Milwaukee Bucks arena is a "good deal all the way around."

Walker made his comments Tuesday while speaking with reporters in Philadelphia.

Walker says he is ready to sign the bill, which passed on a bipartisan 52-34 vote. There were 35 Republicans and 17 Democrats in support, with 20 Republicans and 14 Democrats against.

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VILAS COUNTY - Spiny water fleas look like monsters under a microscope. A long, spiny tail extends from a big body. The creatures are three or four times bigger than their native counterparts, the other zooplankton in Northwoods lakes.

"Spiny water fleas eat our native zooplankton, and our native zooplankton eat our algae," says Carol Warden, an Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist at the UW-Madison Trout Lake Station in Boulder Junction.

That can be a problem for water quality in lakes.

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VILAS COUNTY - "Back in 2010, people wanted answers," says DNR Research Scientist Dr. Carl Watras, who works out of the UW-Madison Trout Lake Research Station in Boulder Junction.

Lake levels across the Northwoods were down. Way down.

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RHINELANDER - Kids these days don't learn like older generations did—they rely on technology.

Some Rhinelander teachers went to school Tuesday to learn about tools like coding and green screens. It's part of a week-long even called Hodag Tech Fest at James Williams Middle School.

It's the second year the school district has hosted the forum for classroom technology, and about 90 Rhinelander teachers and administrators will attend throughout the week. Some of the seminars cover iPads, Chromebooks, Smart Boards and coding. 

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NORTHWOODS - Heartworm can be deadly for a dog if left untreated.

Some veterinarians here in the Northwoods have seen a rise in dogs with heartworm lately.

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MERRILL - Many children don't interact with police officers, but officers want children to have a positive experience around law enforcement. 

That's why the Merrill Police Department do activities like archery with local kids. 

Merrill Police officers taught children how to shoot a bow and arrow at Badges and Bulls Eyes on Tuesday.

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