Loading
Search
NEWS STORIES

Leaves have started to change colors but it's not because of the weatherSubmitted: 08/16/2013
Story By Melissa Constanzer

Leaves have started to change colors but it's not because of the weather
ACROSS THE NORTHWOODS - Look around you and you may notice signs of autumn. We're already starting to see leaves changing colors but experts say this is nothing new for August.

Summer has been on the chilly side of normal. But that is not the cause of some trees in the Northwoods starting to show color.

"What makes them turn is primarily triggered by the day length. As the days get shorter, that's what makes start turning, getting ready for winter," says Jerry Van Cleve, U.S. Forest Service Silviculturist.

There are also other factors that lead to leaves changing. Some may have diseases that can contribute early change.

"The ones that I notice, just the loners that turn early. Usually those tend to red maple. But yeah, you'll see any tree that's under stress will kind of go to yellow whether it's an Aspen, or a Birch, or an Elm," says Jerry Van Cleve.

But give the healthy trees a month or so and they'll be ready to change too. And this year's fall season should be a brightly colored one.

"I think it's going to be a good year, you know, we got some of the ingredients in place. We got a nice wet spring and the summer hasn't been exceedingly hot or dry," said Jerry Van Cleve.

So as long as we get some nice days with above freezing nights, we'll see a lot of vivid colors this fall.

Text Size: + Increase | Decrease -
| Print Story | Email Story
Sponsored in part by HodagSports.com





 IN OTHER NEWS

Play Video

ANTIGO - In a sea of American flags on the east side of Antigo's Elmwood Cemetery, Dick Hurlbert tries to take good care of his younger brother.

"Quite often, because I've got to water the flowers," Hurlbert said.

Daniel Hurlbert's grave is marked with a flag and a plaque for his service in the U.S. Army. The Hurlbert family placed the marker for Daniel when he died in 1999.  But last year, nature started to take control.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - Antigo may get a new kind of housing option in the area. A company is looking to create a new multi-family luxury apartment complex.

This wouldn't be the first time the S.C. Swiderski company invested in Antigo. In 2014, the company worked with the city to build Prosser Place Estates. Now Swiderski wants to build with a different kind of tenant in mind.

+ Read More

WAUSAU - Northern Wisconsin Sen. Tom Tiffany (R-Hazelhurst) expressed disappointment Friday about the Joint Finance Committee's lack of involvement in talks on the state budget, which is already almost one month late.

"Discussions have moved simply to the leadership level for about the last month. I do not like that," Tiffany said. "It should be going through the committee."

+ Read More

WOOD COUNTY - A motorcycle crash in Wood County Thursday night left the rider dead in a ditch.

About 10:30 p.m. Thursday, the Wood County Sheriff's Department got word a damaged motorcycle had been found lying on Lone Pine Road in the Town of Sigel.



+ Read More

WASHINGTON - President Donald Trump says Gen. John F. Kelly is his new White House chief of staff.

That means Reince Priebus is out.

Trump tweeted: "I am pleased to inform you that I have just named General/Secretary John F Kelly as White House Chief of Staff. He is a Great American."

+ Read More

LANGLADE COUNTY - When you go shopping for produce, you normally take a list and pull straight from the store shelf.

But at one Deerbrook farm, you buy a season's worth of vegetables without knowing what you'll get.

+ Read More

Play Video

ANTIGO - Father Bob Obol made his way from a war torn country in Africa to Antigo. 

Obol grew up during a war and a dictatorship in Uganda, Africa in the '70s and '80s.

"There is a day that I've never forgotten," said Obol.

Obol remembers army trucks coming into his town and kidnapping children.

"The focus was just on surviving day-to-day," said Obol.

His key for survival during those times were the people around him.

"During the war, what kept us going was the sense of community," said Obol.

The church is where Obol said he found peace.

"In the community I grew up in the priests was the star of the town and the village," said Obol. 

Obol got a chance to shine in the church as an ordained minister in Uganda in 2001. 

Then he got a surprising opportunity to come to America in 2003.

+ Read More
+ More General News
Search: 





Click Here