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Eagle River hosts 21st annual antique showSubmitted: 07/07/2013
Story By Lauren Stephenson


EAGLE RIVER - People could shop and learn at Northland Pines High School this weekend.

"Jewelry and glass, and pottery, postcards. You name it. There's just a little bit of something for everybody," says Steve Bina, manager of the Eagle River Antique Show.

Twenty-five vendors from six different states set up shop in Eagle River this weekend.

It was the 21st annual Eagle River Antique Show.

Dealers from as far as South Carolina came to town because they know they'll sell quite a bit of antiques.

"One of the things that people do on vacation is they like to go to antique shops and kind of mosey around, and so we just thought it was a natural place for us to have a show," Bina adds.

He expected 1,000 people to attend the two-day show.

"We've always sold well at this show. People up here have the knowledge and appreciation of good antiques," says Frances Rosenau, owner of Time's Treasure's Antiques.

But it's not just about business. Bina donates some of the admission profits to local organizations.

"Some of the money is going to go to the humane society, and then also a share will also go to St. Peter's youth group that are also doing our concessions here today," he says.

Many of the dealers are former teachers. They hope teenagers will become interested in antiques.

"I think it's a wonderful way for students and families to come to learn about beautiful things from different periods of time," says former teacher Clarann Stocker. She now owns Antiques on Spirit.

"Coming to an antique show is like coming to see a piece of the past. It's a history lesson as you walk around here," Bina adds.

He hoped free admission for kids 16 and under would pull them in.

At least 80 teenagers attended the educational experience on Saturday.

But people of all ages could learn a thing or two.

The dealers offered free seminars Sunday.

Frances Rosenau has one simple piece of advice for people who want to collect antiques: "If you're buying for investment, make sure what you're buying is good quality and you can live with it. Our rule about buying something is: if we never sell it, we can die with it and be happy."

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